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Saint Andrew, Apostle

https://images.oca.org/icons/lg/november/1130andrew10.jpg

From: Matthew 4:18-22

The First Disciples Called


[18] As He (Jesus) walked by the Sea of Galilee, He saw two brothers, Simon
who is called Peter and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they
were fishermen. [19] And He said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you fi-
shers of men.” [20] Immediately they left their nets and followed Him. [21] And
going on from there He saw two other brothers, James the son of Zebedee, and
John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets, and
He called them. [22] Immediately, they left the boat and their father, and fol-
lowed Him.

 

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Commentary:

18-22. These four disciples had already met our Lord (John 1:35-42), and their
brief meeting with Him seems to have had a powerful effect on their souls. In
this way Christ prepared their vocation, a fully effective vocation which moved
them to leave everything behind so as to follow Him and be His disciples. Stan-
ding out above their human defects (which the Gospels never conceal), we can
see the exemplary generosity and promptness of the Apostles in answering
God’s call.

The thoughtful reader cannot fail to be struck by the delightful simplicity with
which the evangelists describe the calling of these men in the midst of their
daily work.

“God draws us from the shadows of our ignorance, our groping through history,
and, no matter what our occupation in the world, He calls us in a loud voice, as
He once called Peter and Andrew” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By,” 45).

“This divine and human dialogue completely changed the lives of John and An-
drew, and Peter and James and so many others. It prepared their hearts to lis-
ten to the authoritative teaching which Jesus gave them beside the Sea of Gali-
lee” (”ibid”., 108).

We should notice the words of Sacred Scripture used to describe the alacrity
with which the Apostles follow our Lord. Peter and Andrew “immediately” left
their nets and followed Him. Similarly, James and John “immediately” left the
boats and their father and followed Him. God passes by and calls us. If we do
not answer Him “immediately”, He may continue on His way and we could lose
sight of Him. When God passes by, He may do so rapidly; it would be sad if we
were to fall behind because we wanted to follow Him while still carrying many
things that are only a dead weight and a nuisance.

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Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


Saint Andrew, apostle – Feast

Commentary of the day

Saint John Chrysostom (c.345-407), priest at Antioch then Bishop of Constantinople, Doctor of the Church
Homilies on Saint Matthew’s Gospel, no.14, 2

“Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

What a splendid catch of our Savior’s! Wonder at the disciples’ faith and obedience. As you know, fishing demands undisturbed concentration and yet, right in the middle of their work, they hear Jesus’ call and don’t hesitate for a moment. They don’t say: “Let’s go back home for a word with our relatives.” No, they leave everything and follow him as Elisha did with Elijah (1Kgs 19,20). This is the kind of obedience Christ asks of us: no hesitation even if apparently more urgent requirements are pressing us. That is why, when a young man who wanted to follow him asked whether he might go to bury his father, he didn’t allow him to do so (Mt 8,21). To follow Jesus and obey his word is a duty that comes before all else.

Perhaps you will tell me that the promises he made them were very great? That is precisely why I admire them so much: even when they hadn’t yet seen any miracles, they believed in that very great promise and forsook everything to follow him! It was because they believed that, by means of the same words with which they themselves had been caught, they could go out fishing for others.


Saint Andrew, apostle – Feast

Commentary of the day
Saint John Chrysostom (c.345-407), priest at Antioch then Bishop of Constantinople, Doctor of the Church
Homilies on Saint Matthew’s Gospel, no.14, 2

“Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

What a splendid catch of our Savior’s! Wonder at the disciples’ faith and obedience. As you know, fishing demands undisturbed concentration and yet, right in the middle of their work, they hear Jesus’ call and don’t hesitate for a moment. They don’t say: “Let’s go back home for a word with our relatives.” No, they leave everything and follow him as Elisha did with Elijah (1Kgs 19,20). This is the kind of obedience Christ asks of us: no hesitation even if apparently more urgent requirements are pressing us. That is why, when a young man who wanted to follow him asked whether he might go to bury his father, he didn’t allow him to do so (Mt 8,21). To follow Jesus and obey his word is a duty that comes before all else.

Perhaps you will tell me that the promises he made them were very great? That is precisely why I admire them so much: even when they hadn’t yet seen any miracles, they believed in that very great promise and forsook everything to follow him! It was because they believed that, by means of the same words with which they themselves had been caught, they could go out fishing for others.


To: All

Benedict XVI Lauds Ecumenical Progress – Greets Bartholomew I for Feast of St. Andrew
St. Andrew, the First Called
Pope calls St. Andrew a link to the Eastern Churches
Relic of St. Andrew Given to Greek Orthodox Church
Papal Message to Bartholomew I on Feast of St. Andrew

The Feast of Saint Andrew [November 30th]
St. Andrew Lighting the way for Advent
Orthodox Feast of +Andrew the First- Called Apostle, Nov. 30
Catholic leader calls for St Andrew’s holiday [Scotland]
St Andrew, Apostle


Information: St. Andrew the ApostleFeast Day: November 30

Born: early 1st Century, Bethsaida

Died: mid-late 1st Century, Patras

Major Shrine: Church of St. Andreas at Patras

Patron of: Scotland, Russia, Sicily, Greece, Romania, Amalfi, Luqa (Malta) and Prussia; Army Rangers, mariners, fishermen, fishmongers, rope-makers, singers and performers

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St. Andrew the Apostle

 

Feast Day: November 30
Born / Died: around the time of Jesus

St. Andrew was born at Bethsaida in Israel. He and his brother, Simon Peter, grew up to become fishermen. And when Andrew heard the great St. John the Baptist preach, he became his disciple.

When Jesus came to be baptized, John pointed to Jesus and said, “Behold the Lamb of God,” Andrew understood that Jesus was greater. At once he left John and followed Jesus.

Jesus knew that Andrew was walking behind him and turning back, asked why he was being followed. Andrew said that he would like to know where Jesus lived. Jesus warmly invited him to, “Come and see.”

Andrew had been with Jesus only a short while when he realized that this was truly the Messiah and he became the first disciple of Christ. Then Andrew brought his brother Simon (St. Peter) to Jesus. The Lord welcomed him as his disciple too.

At first the two brothers continued their fishing trade and family affairs. But soon the Lord called them to stay with him all the time. He promised to make them fishers of men, and this time they left their nets for good. St. Andrew went through life leading people to Jesus, both before and after Jesus died.

After Jesus ascended into heaven, St. Andrew preached the Gospel in Greece. There, he was put to death on a saltire cross (x shaped), to which he was tied, not nailed.

He lived two days in that state of suffering but still found enough strength to preach to the people who gathered around their beloved apostle.

Hundreds of years later, when the king of Scotland faced a large invading army, he prayed for guidance. A white cloud in the form of a saltire cross floated in the blue sky above him and he won the battle. Saint Andrew was named the patron saint of Scotland and the Saltire became the national flag of Scotland.

St. Andrew is also the patron saint of Russia.

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CATHOLIC ALMANACMonday, November 30

Liturgical Color: Red

Today is the Feast of St. Andrew,
Apostle. For his preaching, St. Andrew
was crucified on an X-shaped cross. He
remained alive for several days,
continuing to preach the gospel to those
who came to view his execution.

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Catholic Culture

Advent: November 30th

Feast of St. Andrew, apostle

» Enjoy our Liturgical Seasons series of e-books!

Old Calendar: St. Andrew

St. Andrew was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee, a fisherman by trade, and a former disciple of John the Baptist. He was the one who introduced his brother Peter to Jesus, saying, “We have found the Messiah.” Overshadowed henceforth by his brother, Andrew nevertheless appears again in the Gospels as introducing souls to Christ. After Pentecost, Andrew took up the apostolate on a much wider scale, and is said to have been martyred at Patras in southern Greece on a cross which was in the form of an “X”. This type of cross has long been known as “St. Andrew’s cross.”


Jesse Tree ~ Adam and Eve


 

 

St. Andrew (or Andreas) the Apostle

Andrew, Peter’s brother, and John were the first disciples to follow the Lord. With tender delicacy the Gospel (John 1:35-42) describes their first meeting with Jesus. Andrew did not belong to the inner circle of the apostles, Peter, James and John, and the evangelists narrate nothing extraordinary about him (John 6:8); but tradition (resting on apocrpyhal Acts) extols his great love of the Cross and of the Savior; and the Church distinguishes him both in the Mass (his name occurs in the Canon and in the Libera since the time of Pope St. Gregory I who had a special devotion to him) and in the Breviary.

The story of his martyrdom rests on the apocryphal Acts which lack historical foundation. The pagan judge exhorted him to sacrifice to the gods. Andrew replied: “I sacrifice daily to almighty God, the one and true God. Not the flesh of oxen and the blood of goats do I offer, but the unspotted Lamb upon the altar. All the faithful partake of His flesh, yet the Lamb remains unharmed and living.” Angered by the reply, Aegeas commanded him to be thrown into prison. With little difficulty the people would have freed him, but Andrew personally calmed the mob and earnestly entreated them to desist, as he was hastening toward an ardently desired crown of martyrdom.

When Andrew was led to the place of martyrdom, on beholding the cross from a distance he cried out: “O good Cross, so long desired and now set up for my longing soul I confident and rejoicing come to you; exultingly receive me, a disciple of Him who hung on you.” Forthwith he was nailed to the cross. For two days he hung there alive, unceasingly proclaiming the doctrine of Christ until he passed on to Him whose likeness in death he had so vehemently desired. –The legendary account of our saint’s martyrdom has this value: it presents to us the mysticism of the Cross of later times.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch.

Patron: Achaia; Amalfi, Italy; anglers; Burgundy; diocese of Constantinople; fish dealers; fish mongers; fishermen; gout; Greece; Lampertheim; Germany; maidens; old maids; Patras, Greece; Russia; Scotland; singers; sore throats; spinsters; University of Patras; unmarried women; women who wish to become mothers.

Symbols: Fish; Saint Andrew’s cross; Cross saltire (x-shaped); V or Y shaped cross; two fishes; tall cross and book; vertical spear; primitive fish hook; fisherman’s net.
Often Portrayed As: Man bound to a cross; man preaching from a cross; preacher holding some fish.

Things to Do:

  • Today’s feast traditionally marks the end of the Church year and beginning of Advent. Advent always begins on the Sunday closest to November 30, with this day being the last possible day of the old Liturgical Year. Christmas is right around the corner. An old saying reflected this:

    St Andrew the King
    Three weeks and three days
    before Christmas begins.

    Because weddings were not allowed during Advent and Christmas and Andrew is the patron of unmarried maidens, many countries have marriage-related superstitions connected to this day. See Patron Saints Index for a few traditions.

  • Beginning today the Christmas Anticipatory Prayer, also known as the “Novena to St. Andrew” (Hail and Blessed be the hour…) is prayed every day until Christmas.
  • View some of the art depictions of St. Andrew. Here’s another Gallery of Images of Andrew.
  • Remember to pray for fishermen and all who make their livelihood by the sea.
  • Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, Russia, and Romania. The flag of Scotland (and the Union Flag and the arms and Flag of Nova Scotia) feature a saltire (X-shaped cross) in commemoration of the shape of St. Andrew’s cross.
  • Read more about St. Andrew from Butler’s Lives of the Saints. Also read about Andrew from The Golden Legend.
  • Foods connected with this feast: St. Andrew was a fishermen, so fish dishes and biblical themes would reign supreme. Women for Faith and Family have reprinted Evelyn Vitz’s suggested “Biblical Dinner” menu. But there are other foods connected with this day:
    • Scotland: St. Andrew is the patron of Scotland. Scones, haggis, sheepshead and fish dishes are traditional. The scones are called “wigs”, although their shape is rectangular.
    • England: St Andrew is a patron of lace-makers. On his feast, sometimes known as “Tander”, areas such as Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Northamptonshire celebrate by feasting, drinking elderberry wine, sports and serving a special cake called the Tandra Cake, particularly in Bedfordshire. It has a bread dough base to which lard, sugar, currants, lemon peel and eggs are added. This is also a day for squirrel hunting in England, so Brunswick Stew would be another dish on the table in England.
    • Slovakian Countries: Halushky (pasta dish) is cooked. Unmarried girls place slips of paper with names of single young men into the dish.
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The Word Among Us

Meditation: Matthew 4:18-22

Saint Andrew, Apostle (Feast)

Peter, and his brother Andrew … (Matthew 4:18)

 

When we first meet Andrew in Matthew’s Gospel, he is fishing with his brother Peter. In fact, all four Gospels regularly identify Andrew with Peter. Does this mean he is just a sidekick to the lead apostle, kind of like Robin was to Batman? No, their relationship is much more equal, more like Paul and Barnabas.

Neither brother would have been the man they were without the other. Neither of them would have developed their unique gifts without the relationship and solidarity they had together. They needed each other!

As a disciple of John the Baptist, Andrew was one of the first to follow Jesus. He’s the one who evangelized his brother Peter, in fact! So clearly, Peter would have been a very different man had it not been for Andrew. His simple, steady faith must have made a deep impact on the impulsive fisherman. And for his part, Andrew most likely thrived under Peter’s leadership as the infant Church began to spread out from Jerusalem in the days after Pentecost.

Even though Andrew was not often in the limelight, people knew him as someone to depend on, whether it was the boy who gave him his loaves and fishes (John 6:8-9) or Philip, who asked him what to do with the Greeks who wanted to meet Jesus (12:20-22). Andrew was happy to work behind the scenes, and his steady faith produced a lot of fruit!

This is what makes Andrew a perfect model for us. Perhaps you see yourself as a simple, everyday Catholic. You may not have a big platform to evangelize. You may not have an important role in your parish. You may not have much influence over other people. But you are not just a sidekick. Like Andrew, you are a pillar of the Church. It just wouldn’t be the same without you.

We don’t often see the impact that we have on the Church. We don’t often know how much of a difference our intercessions make in the grand scheme of things. But God knows. He treasures every one of our prayers, and he rejoices every time we turn from temptation and trust in him. So keep on following the Lord; we need you!

“Lord, thank you for calling me into your service! Thank you for giving me an essential role to play in your Church!”

 

Romans 10:9-18
Psalm 19:8-11

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Regnum Christi

A Decisive Response
U. S. A. | SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
November 30, 2015 – Feast of Saint Andrew, apostle

 

By Father Edward Hopkins, LC
Matthew 4:18-22

As Jesus was walking by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, “Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.” At once they left their nets and followed him. He walked along from there and saw two other brothers, James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They were in a boat, with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left their boat and their father and followed him.

Introductory Prayer: Dear Jesus, I believe that you have called me to follow you more closely today. I trust that in this prayer, you will help me see the concrete implications of following your will. I love you and want to respond to all that you ask of me, today and always. Thank you for watching over me and guiding me home to heaven.

Petition: Make me a fisher of men, here and now, Lord!

  1. As Jesus Walked By: One summer afternoon a priest just happened to be in the area and visited my home. Within three years, two of my brothers and I were following Christ on the road to the priesthood. Jesus didn’t just happen to walk by these two pairs of brothers! He had every intention of inviting those brothers to become “fishers of men.” How much happens in my life, prepared and intended by God, to help me follow him more closely? And all I see is an accident, a coincidence? Ask him when was the last time he just happened by.
  1. At Once They Followed Him: Jesus never calls someone when it’s perfectly convenient, when that person has nothing better to do. No, he calls precisely when we are in the middle of living our life, doing what we do best, what we do most, “casting or mending our nets.” “What a losing formula!” we are tempted to conclude. Yet what is it he really wants of us when he calls? He wants a response — a reply of love. Love is all about preference and priority. If I love him more than myself, I can follow him “at once.” If I prefer him over my own activities and life, I can follow him “immediately.” What is the response of love I am giving or want to give Jesus today in my life?
  1. They Left Something Behind: “Pro-choice:” That’s what God is! He wants us to choose. But he is not indifferent about what we choose. Every choice implies the rejection of other options. We cannot follow someone somewhere without leaving something and someone else behind. Peter and Andrew left their nets behind. James and John left their boat and their father behind. This was possible only with Jesus before them. Yet we, too, often try to follow Christ without leaving things and others behind: the world, comforts, my preferences… We think that we can have it all. We can’t. We are in danger of “taming our faith,” bending to the demands of our passions and the world’s insistence. Love requires a choice, a choice for the real, complete Jesus. It asks me to reject everything in me that is not him. How wholehearted is my following of Christ?

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, you have called me and continue to call me throughout this day. Help me to respond with love, a love that trumps all my other loves, likes and desires. I don’t want you to have to wait for me, Lord. Just show me what you want and give me the courage and generosity to give it to you, no matter the cost.

Resolution: I will give up something today that diminishes the attention that I give to my spouse, family or friends.

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Homily of the Day

There is a video on YouTube that experimented on what passersby would do if someone simply collapsed in a public place and sought help. Shockingly, many people who walked by could not be bothered and simply walked on. The video looks like a modern version of the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Lk 10:25  36)

Hopefully many of us would say that we would not be like the priest or the Levite in the parable or many in the video who did not stop to help.   We would think that we would stop to offer our help or, at the very least, to see if we could help.  We believe, after all, that this is what a good Christian would do.

The story portrayed in today’s Gospel reading is similar, although not exactly the same. Simon and Andrew, fishermen, were casting their nets, and James and John were helping their father mend their nets. They wanted to join Jesus in “fishing for people.”

Jesus knew he needed help in his task of preaching the Good News; he could not do his task alone. He needed the help of others. Jesus asked them to help him and they left what they were doing to follow him.

How many among us would do what these four fishermen did? Can we simply abandon our current occupation, our concerns, and our worries so that we can do God’s work? If we think we are already doing God’s work, how are we challenged to follow Jesus and be  “fishers of people”?

The man in the video was in need of help, like the pilgrim who fell into the hands of robbers.  Who are people like them in our lives today? Do we just pass by and not bother or do we heed the call to help those in need?

Not only are we urged to do as the good Samaritan. More important Jesus identifies with those in need.

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One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 31, Issue 6

<< Monday, November 30, 2015 >> St. Andrew
Romans 10:9-18
View Readings
Psalm 19:8-11 Matthew 4:18-22
Similar Reflections

ARE YOU SAVED?

“If you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.” —Romans 10:9
“Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.” —Romans 10:13

Are you saved? The Biblical answer for a Christian to that question is: “I have been saved by Christ’s death and resurrection.” “When the kindness and love of God our Savior appeared, He saved us” (Ti 3:4-5). “He saved us; not because of any righteous deeds we had done, but because of His mercy. He saved us through the baptism of new birth and renewal by the Holy Spirit” (Ti 3:5). Moreover, we not only have been saved but are being saved by the gospel at this very moment, if we hold fast to it (1 Cor 15:2). Finally, we will be saved, if we persevere in living our Baptisms (see Rm 10:9, 13).

If we have been, are being, and will be saved, we will be motivated by love (see 2 Cor 5:14) to lead others to salvation in Jesus. However, we may be bewildered about sharing our faith. St. Andrew may be the perfect person to help us. For example, when some Greeks came to Philip and asked to see Jesus, Philip, for some reason, did not go to Jesus but to Andrew (Jn 12:21-22). Then Philip, with Andrew, “came to inform Jesus” (Jn 12:22).

Accept Jesus as the Savior, Lord, and God. Ask St. Andrew to help you lead others to salvation in Jesus. Then go, be fishers of men (Mt 4:19), and make disciples of all nations (Mt 28:19).

Prayer: Father, beginning this Advent make my voice sound “over the whole earth” and my “words to the limits of the world” (Rm 10:18). St. Andrew, pray for us.
Promise: “Scripture says, ‘How beautiful are the feet of those who announce good news!’ ” – – Rm 10:15
Praise: St. Andrew was one of the first to lead others to Jesus.

The Dedication of the Lateran Basilica

Pictures

 

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/religion/3704620/posts?page=1

Saint/Feast of the Day — Dedication of Saint John Lateran

 


 

 

 


 

 

Information: Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in RomeFeast Day: November 9

 


 

 

CATHOLIC ALMANACFriday, November 9

Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Feast of the Dedication of the
Lateran Basilica in Rome. This basilica is the
oldest of the 4 major basilicas of Rome. It
became the Cathedral of Rome around 311 A.D.

 


 

 

Catholic Culture

Ordinary Time: November 9th

Feast of the Dedication of St. John Lateran Basilica

MASS READINGS

November 09, 2018 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

O God, who from living and chosen stones prepare an eternal dwelling for your majesty, increase in your Church the spirit of grace you have bestowed, so that by new growth your faithful people may build up the heavenly Jerusalem. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Almighty and merciful God, by whose gift your faithful offer you right and praiseworthy service, grant, we pray, that we may hasten without stumbling to receive the things you have promised. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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Old Calendar: Dedication of the Archbasilica of Our Holy Savior; St. Theodore, martyr ; Other Titles: Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica; Dedication of St. John Lateran

Today the Church celebrates the feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome, the oldest and highest ranking of the four major basilicas in Rome. The Basilica of St. John Lateran is the cathedral of the diocese of Rome, the official ecclesiastical seat of the Holy Father, the Bishop of Rome, not St. Peter’s Basilica as so many mistakenly believe. The Basilica is also called the Church of Holy Savior or the Church of St. John Baptist. In ancient Rome this was the church where everyone was baptized. It the oldest church in the West, built in the time of Constantine and was consecrated by Pope Sylvester in 324. This feast became a universal celebration in honor of the archbasilica, the ecclesiastical mother church, called “the mother and mistress of all churches of Rome and the world” (omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput), as a sign of love for and union with the See of Peter.

According to the 1962 Missal of St. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the commemoration of St. Theodore, a Christian soldier and martyr of Asia Minor.

 


The Temple of Stones is a Symbol of the Living Church
Today the liturgy celebrates the dedication of the Lateran Basilica, called “mother and head of all the churches of the city and the world.” In fact, this basilica was the first to be built after Emperor Constantine’s edict, in 313, granted Christians freedom to practice their religion.

The emperor himself gave Pope Miltiades the ancient palace of the Laterani family, and the basilica, the baptistery, and the patriarchate, that is, the Bishop of Rome’s residence — where the Popes lived until the Avignon period — were all built there. The basilica’s dedication was celebrated by Pope Sylvester around 324 and was named Most Holy Savior; only after the 6th century were the names of St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist added, and now is typically denominated by these latter.

Initially the observance of this feast was confined to the city of Rome; then, beginning in 1565, it was extended to all the Churches of the Roman rite. The honoring of this sacred edifice was a way of expressing love and veneration for the Roman Church, which, as St. Ignatius of Antioch says, “presides in charity” over the whole Catholic communion (Letter to the Romans, 1:1).

On this solemnity the Word of God recalls an essential truth: the temple of stones is a symbol of the living Church, the Christian community, which in their letters the Apostles Peter and Paul already understood as a “spiritual edifice,” built by God with “living stones,” namely, Christians themselves, upon the one foundation of Jesus Christ, who is called the “cornerstone” (cf. 1 Corinthians 3:9-11, 16-17; 1 Peter 2:4-8; Ephesians 2:20-22). “Brothers, you are God’s building,” St. Paul wrote, and added: “holy is God’s temple, which you are” (1 Corinthians 3:9c, 17).

The beauty and harmony of the churches, destined to give praise to God, also draws us human beings, limited and sinful, to convert to form a “cosmos,” a well-ordered structure, in intimate communion with Jesus, who is the true Saint of saints. This happens in a culminating way in the Eucharistic liturgy, in which the “ecclesia,” that is, the community of the baptized, come together in a unified way to listen to the Word of God and nourish themselves with the Body and Blood of Christ. From these two tables the Church of living stones is built up in truth and charity and is internally formed by the Holy Spirit transforming herself into what she receives, conforming herself more and more to the Lord Jesus Christ. She herself, if she lives in sincere and fraternal unity, in this way becomes the spiritual sacrifice pleasing to God.

Dear friends, today’s feast celebrates a mystery that is always relevant: God’s desire to build a spiritual temple in the world, a community that worships him in spirit and truth (cf. John 4:23-24). But this observance also reminds us of the importance of the material buildings in which the community gathers to celebrate the praises of God. Every community therefore has the duty to take special care of its own sacred buildings, which are a precious religious and historical patrimony. For this we call upon the intercession of Mary Most Holy, that she help us to become, like her, the “house of God,” living temple of his love.

— Benedict XVI, Angelus Address, November 9, 2008

Things to Do:

 

  • Learn more about St. John Lateran;
  • This basilica represents the place of baptism, so it would be a good time to renew your baptismal promises;
  • It also represents heaven, so we can meditate on the joys of heaven and God’s generosity in giving us sufficient graces to be saved;
  • Since St. John Lateran is the Pope’s church, say a prayer for our Holy Father;
  • From the Catholic Culture Library: Mother Church of the World.

 


St. Theodore
St. Theodore was a Christian soldier who set on fire the temple of the mother-goddess Cybele at Amasea (303 A.D.). The prefect of the legion promised mercy if he repented his act and renounced the Christian faith. Theodore persevered bravely; accordingly he was cast into prison and his flesh ripped by iron hooks so that his ribs were exposed. In the midst of indescribable torture he sang joyfully, “I will bless the Lord at all times; His praise will ever be in my mouth” (Ps. 33).

Praying and singing the glories of Christ, he was burned alive on November 9. A panegyric by St. Gregory of Nyssa on his virtues is extant. Theodore’s head has been venerated at Cajeta since the Middle Ages. In ancient times, particularly among the Greeks, this soldier-martyr was honored as patron of armies. During the seventh century a church was dedicated to him in Rome, and his picture appears upon the apse mosaic in the church of Sts. Cosmas and Damian.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Symbols: Post and iron hooks; white horse; temple of Cybele in flames; crown of thorns; cross; Roman armour; sword.

Things to Do:

 

  • Well might we marvel at the heroic courage St. Theodore showed in the midst of pain. While suffering horribly he sang songs of praise! And we are so frightened by the smallest ache and become uncomfortable at the very mention of suffering! God does not ask such suffering from us as He did from Theodore, yet He asks that we accept some troubles patiently. If we have any discomfort today, let us offer it up without complaint;
  • Also, remember our soldiers and say a prayer for them;
  • Read what St. Gregory of Nyssa wrote about St. Theodore.

 


 

 

The Word Among Us

Meditation: 1 Corinthians 3:9-11, 16-17

The Dedication of the Lateran Basilica (Feast)

You are God’s building. (1 Corinthians 3:9)

 

We don’t typically think of ourselves as a building. But use your imagination. If you could choose to be any kind of building, what would you be? Maybe you’d want to be a simple quaint cottage in the woods. Or perhaps you see yourself as a sleek high-rise condominium in the heart of a vibrant city.

Whatever kind of structure you might prefer to be, consider what gives any building its real value. It’s not the exterior, however beautiful or grand, that makes a house a home. It’s the people who occupy it. It’s the people, the “living stones” who dwell there, that make a building a place of warmth, light, and peace.

Today we celebrate the dedication of the Basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, the official seat of the Holy Father. The basilica’s stunning architecture, inlaid marble, colorful mosaics, and finely carved statues attract visitors from around the world. But it’s not the building’s beauty and majesty we celebrate today. It’s the “living stones” that have filled it over the centuries. It’s the faithful members of the Church whose hearts and minds are filled with Jesus and his Spirit.

Whatever kind of building you imagine yourself to be, it’s unlikely you would describe yourself as that beautiful basilica. Few of us would be so bold as to compare ourselves to such a magnificent building! But Paul reminds us that it’s not our exterior that matters. It’s what is inside of us. Through our baptism, God lives in us. We radiate the presence of his only beloved Son. Our heavenly Father sees many different facets of his beauty and his glory in us. And that makes you just as beautiful as the most grandly constructed cathedral.

Today, no matter what kind of building you think you are, let God show you who you really are. You are the space where he comes and abides. The glory of the Lord shines through every window of your heart. Because you are his building, he depends on you. You are that warm and inviting place where other people can encounter Jesus.

“Jesus, I want to be your building. Help me to reach those who most need you.”

 

Ezekiel 47:1-2, 8-9, 12
Psalm 46:2-3, 5-6, 8-9
John 2:13-22

 


 

 

Marriage = One Man and One Woman Until Death Do Us Part

 

 


 

 

Regnum Christi

November 9, 2018 – The Indestructible Temple

Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica Father Steven Reilly, LC

John 2: 13-22

The Passover of the Jews was near, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. In the temple he found people selling cattle, sheep, and doves, and the money changers seated at their tables. Making a whip of cords, he drove all of them out of the temple, both the sheep and the cattle. He also poured out the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables. He told those who were selling the doves, “Take these things out of here! Stop making my Father’s house a marketplace!” His disciples remembered that it was written, “Zeal for your house will consume me.” The Jews then said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” The Jews then said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?” But he was speaking of the temple of his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.

 

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe that you are here with me, and I hope in your boundless mercy and love. Thank you for watching over me and keeping me in your friendship. Thank you for the precious gift of our Mother, the Church.

 

Petition: Lord, increase my zeal!

 

  1. The Indestructible Temple: Today we celebrate the dedication of St. John Lateran Basilica, known as the “mother and head of all the churches.” Going to Rome and visiting this wonderful church, now some seventeen centuries old, one gets a sense of the durability of Catholicism. The Catholic Church has been around for a long time, and it will be around for a lot longer — until judgment day, to be exact. No matter how hard the world has tried, it hasn’t been able to destroy the temple of the Church. This should give us a deep confidence that the Lord is with us as we journey through history.

 

  1. Purification: Being indestructible doesn’t mean, however, that the Catholic Church does not need constant purification. When our Lord came to the temple in Jerusalem, he found many things that marred the spirit of prayer and devotion that was to characterize that sacred building. His vigorous reaction serves to underline the high vocation of holiness that God had given to the Chosen People. We Catholics have inherited that call; yet all too often, the ways of the world creep into our souls. Each one of us needs to submit to the Lord’s purification. He will challenge us in our conscience, and sometimes that will sting like the whip of cords. But if we are sincere in our desires, we accept this with humility, aware that our souls must be living temples of God’s presence.

 

  1. Consuming Zeal: When the apostles contemplated our Lord’s action in the temple, “zeal” was the word that summed it all up. Jesus is zealous because he doesn’t accept the status quo of entrenched mediocrity. The day he arrives it is no longer business as usual: His Father’s house WILL be respected. Too often we let the barnacles of laziness and the accretions of apathy weigh down and extinguish our zeal. Every day we must pray that the Lord will once again “enkindle in our hearts the fire of his love.” Our zeal in living the faith is part of the way God works to make this temple of his Church indestructible. Don’t we want to cooperate with his love, so that the “gates of hell will not prevail?”

 

Conversation with Christ: Lord, I love your Church. I thank you for the priceless gift of my Catholic faith. Protect the Church from all her enemies and help me to be an effective apostle filled with authentic zeal.

Resolution: I will offer myself to collaborate in a parish ministry or other Catholic apostolate out of love for the Church.

 


 

 

Homily of the Day

In the leansing and purification of the Temple, Jesus drew attention to himself as the new Temple. The presence of God was no longer signified in a man-made Temple but now realized in his Person. Then the Father’s goodness, righteousness and justice would be most visible, like in the magnificent Temple of Jerusalem.

The lesson we draw from the Gospel reading is how we too are called to purification and perfection, starting from our individual selves to our collective selves as a people. We begin our cleansing with the symbols that shape our individual identities: the personal values we hold, the truth we profess, our personal views of the world. We ask ourselves whether our living out of these symbols and values reflects the laws of God, expresses righteousness, radiates goodness and renders truth and justice. We also ask ourselves if we are able to make the necessary sacrifices of humility by allowing ourselves to be corrected to give way to what is right and good and to bring our personal interests in harmony with the greater common good.

On the societal level we ask ourselves if we are actively vigilant in protecting our collective symbols and values as a people from being perverted by selfish and ill-willed individuals or groups in our society. We make a collective examination of conscience if we have not instead contributed to the decay and fading away of the symbols of our collective identity by allowing ourselves to be used because we stand to benefit from the lies, deceptions and manipulations of many. What are these collective symbols we should protect and preserve as a people? These are the laws of our country, our social and political structures, our culture and common ethics, our social and religious celebrations.

Why this purification and cleansing? Because we are temples of the Holy Spirit in the world. We are in the presence of God in the world. We are indeed God’s presence in the world. In us God carries out his continuing mission of liberating and saving the world.

 


 

 

One Bread, One Body

 

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Espanol

All Issues > Volume 34, Issue 6

<< Friday, November 9, 2018 >> Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome
 
Ezekiel 47:1-2, 8-9, 12
1 Corinthians 3:9-11, 16-17

View Readings
Psalm 46:2-3, 5-6, 8-9
John 2:13-22

Similar Reflections
 

“ONE BREAD, ONE BODY”

 
“The temple of God is holy, and you are that temple.” �1 Corinthians 3:17
 
Today we celebrate the anniversary of the dedication of the Lateran Basilica, which is considered the mother church of Christianity. Today we remember that there is only one Church because “there is but one body and one Spirit, just as there is but one hope given all of you by your call. There is one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all” (Eph 4:4-6).

Jesus prayed “that all may be one as You, Father, are in Me, and I in You; I pray that they may be [one] in Us, that the world may believe that You sent Me” (Jn 17:21). God’s plan of salvation is “to bring all things in the heavens and on earth into one under Christ’s headship” (Eph 1:10).

Unity in Christ is necessary for the fulfillment of God’s plan for world evangelization. We have grown accustomed to centuries of disunity, thousands of denominations, and a debilitated Christianity. Many Christians have forgotten that Jesus is praying for His family to be one. Many have ceased even to want to be Church by God’s standards. We must repent, be reconciled, and be one as the Father and Son are One.

 
Prayer: Father, may we repent and accept the Holy Spirit of unity (Eph 4:3).
Promise: “No one can lay a foundation other than the one that has been laid, namely Jesus Christ.” —1 Cor 3:11
Praise: Father Ted’s multicultural parish reflects the unity and diversity of the universal Church. Praise God for the Body of Christ!

 


 

 

Saint’s Michael, Gabriel and Raphael, Archangels

Jacob’s Ladder

(c.1490)
Avignon, Musee du Petit Palais

 


Catholic Culture

Ordinary Time: September 29th

Feast of Sts. Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael, Archangels

MASS READINGS

September 29, 2018 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

O God, who dispose in marvelous order ministries both angelic and human, graciously grant that our life on earth may be defended by those who watch over us as they minister perpetually to you in heaven. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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» Enjoy our Liturgical Seasons series of e-books!

Old Calendar: Dedication of the Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel (Michaelmas Day)

The liturgy celebrates the feast of these three archangels who are venerated in the tradition of the Church. Michael (Who is like God?) was the archangel who fought against Satan and all his evil angels, defending all the friends of God. He is the protector of all humanity from the snares of the devil. Gabriel (Strength of God) announced to Zachariah the forthcoming birth of John the Baptist, and to Mary, the birth of Jesus. His greeting to the Virgin, “Hail, full of grace,” is one of the most familiar and frequent prayers of the Christian people. Raphael (Medicine of God) is the archangel who took care of Tobias on his journey.

According to the 1962 Missal of St. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the feast of St. Michael. St. Gabriel is observed on March 24 and St. Raphael on October 24.


The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches us that, “[T]he existence of the spiritual, non-corporeal beings that Sacred Scripture usually calls “angels” is a truth of faith. The witness of Scripture is as clear as the unanimity of Tradition.”

Angels are pure, created spirits. The name angel means servant or messenger of God. Angels are celestial or heavenly beings, on a higher order than human beings. Angels have no bodies and do not depend on matter for their existence or activity. They are distinct from saints, which men can become. Angels have intellect and will, and are immortal. They are a vast multitude, but each is an individual person. Archangels are one of the nine choirs of angels listed in the Bible. In ascending order, the choirs or classes are 1) Angels, 2) Archangels, 3) Principalities, 4) Powers, 5) Virtues, 6) Dominations, 7) Thrones, 8) Cherubim, and 9) Seraphim.


St. Michael
The name of the archangel Michael means, in Hebrew, who is like unto God? and he is also known as “the prince of the heavenly host.” He is usually pictured as a strong warrior, dressed in armor and wearing sandals. His name appears in Scripture four times, twice in the Book of Daniel, and once each in the Epistle of St. Jude and the Book of Revelation. From Revelation we learn of the battle in heaven, with St. Michael and his angels combatting Lucifer and the other fallen angels (or devils). We invoke St. Michael to help us in our fight against Satan; to rescue souls from Satan, especially at the hour of death; to be the champion of the Jews in the Old Testament and now Christians; and to bring souls to judgment.

This day is referred to as “Michaelmas” in many countries and is also one of the harvest feast days. In England this is one of the “quarter days”, which was marked by hiring servants, electing magistrates, and beginning of legal and university terms. This day also marks the opening of the deer and other large game hunting season. In some parts of Europe, especially Germany, Denmark, and Austria, a special wine called “Saint Michael’s Love” (Michelsminne) is drunk on this day. The foods for this day vary depending on nationality. In the British Isles, for example, goose was the traditional meal for Michaelmas, eaten for prosperity, France has waffles or Gaufres and the traditional fare in Scotland used to be St. Michael’s Bannock (Struan Micheil) — a large, scone-like cake. In Italy, gnocchi is the traditional fare.

Patron: Against temptations; against powers of evil; artists; bakers; bankers; battle; boatmen; cemeteries; coopers; endangered children; dying; Emergency Medical Technicians; fencing; grocers; hatmakers; holy death; knights; mariners; mountaineers; paramedics; paratroopers; police officers; radiologists; sailors; the sick; security forces; soldiers; against storms at sea; swordsmiths; those in need of protection; Brussels, Belgium; Caltanissett, Sicily; Cornwall, England; Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee Florida; England; Germany; Archdiocese of Mobile, Alabama; Papua, New Guinea; Puebla, Mexico; San Miguel de Allende, Mexico; Sibenik, Croatia; Archdiocese of Seattle, Washington; Diocese of Springfield, Massachusetts.

Symbols: Angel with wings; dressed in armour; lance and shield; scales; shown weighing souls; millstone; piercing dragon or devil; banner charged with a dove; symbolic colors orange or gold.


St. Gabriel
St. Gabriel’s name means “God is my strength”. Biblically he appears three times as a messenger. He had been sent to Daniel to explain a vision concerning the Messiah. He appeared to Zachary when he was offering incense in the Temple, to foretell the birth of his son, St. John the Baptist. St. Gabriel is most known as the angel chosen by God to be the messenger of the Annunciation, to announce to mankind the mystery of the Incarnation.

The angel’s salutation to our Lady, so simple and yet so full of meaning, Hail Mary, full of grace, has become the constant and familiar prayer of all Christian people.

Patron: Ambassadors; broadcasting; childbirth; clergy; communications; diplomats; messengers; philatelists; postal workers; public relations; radio workers; secular clergy; stamp collectors; telecommunications; Portugal; Archdiocese of Seattle, Washington.

Symbols: Archangel; sceptre and lily; MR or AM shield; lantern; mirror; olive branch; scroll with words Ave Maria Gratia Plena; Resurrection trumpet; shield; spear; lily; symbolic colors, silver or blue.


St. Raphael
Our knowledge of the Archangel Raphael comes to us from the book of Tobit. His mission as wonderful healer and fellow traveller with the youthful Tobias has caused him to be invoked for journeys and at critical moments in life. Tradition also holds that Raphael is the angel that stirred the waters at the healing sheep pool in Bethesda. His name means “God has healed”.

Patron: Blind; bodily ills; counselors; druggists; eye problems; guardian angels; happy meetings; healers; health inspectors; health technicians; love; lovers; mental illness; nurses; pharmacists; physicians; shepherds; against sickness; therapists; travellers; young people; young people leaving home for the first time; Archdiocese of Dubuque, Iowa; Archdiocese of Seattle, Washington.

Symbols: Staff; wallet and fish; staff and gourd; archangel; young man carrying a staff; young man carrying a fish; walking with Tobias; holding a bottle or flask; symbolic colors, gray or yellow.

Things to Do:

  • This is a good feast to learn more about the angels. Children especially are fascinated by these celestial beings. The best place to start is the Catechism of the Catholic Church, nos. 328-336 to see the teachings of the Church on angels. John Paul II also did a Catechesis on the Angels during his General Audiences from July 9 to August 20, 1986.
  • Find the passages in the Bible about angels, in particular the passages about Michael, Gabriel and Raphael.
  • Read the section on angels in the Directory on Popular Piety and Liturgy. The document examines the doctrine and devotions of the angels. Devotion to angels is good, but also can have deviations.

    Devotion to the Holy Angels gives rise to a certain form of the Christian life which is characterized by:

    • devout gratitude to God for having placed these heavenly spirits of great sanctity and dignity at the service of man;
    • an attitude of devotion deriving from the knowledge of living constantly in the presence of the Holy Angels of God — serenity and confidence in facing difficult situations, since the Lord guides and protects the faithful in the way of justice through the ministry of His Holy Angels. Among the prayers to the Guardian Angels the Angele Dei is especially popular, and is often recited by families at morning and evening prayers, or at the recitation of the Angelus.

    217. Popular devotion to the Holy Angels, which is legitimate and good, can, however, also give rise to possible deviations:

    • when, as sometimes can happen, the faithful are taken by the idea that the world is subject to demiurgical struggles, or an incessant battle between good and evil spirits, or Angels and daemons, in which man is left at the mercy of superior forces and over which he is helpless; such cosmologies bear little relation to the true Gospel vision of the struggle to overcome the devil, which requires moral commitment, a fundamental option for the Gospel, humility and prayer;
    • when the daily events of life, which have nothing or little to do with our progressive maturing on the journey towards Christ are read schematically or simplistically, indeed childishly, so as to ascribe all setbacks to the devil and all success to the Guardian Angels. The practice of assigning names to the Holy Angels should be discouraged, except in the cases of Gabriel, Raphael and Michael whose names are contained in Holy Scripture.
  • Also read All About the Angels.
  • Memorize the prayer to St. Michael the Archangel. Although no longer formally recited after Mass, our Holy Father John Paul II has encouraged us to recite this prayer daily. Read about this prayer. Here is the Regina Caeli message from April 24, 1994 during which the pope encouraged this prayer.
  • In honor of St. Gabriel, Learn the Angelus and recite it daily. Traditionally, the prayer is prayed at the 6:00 and 12:00 hours (am and pm). There is a partial indulgence attached to those who pray this prayer.
  • Read the Book of Tobit for the story of St. Raphael helping Tobit and Tobias.
  • Make some recipes related to Michaelmas. Of special mention is the St. Michael Bannock from Scotland, roast goose and stuffing from Britain, waffles from France, and roast duck from Germany or France, gnocchi from Italy. Blackberries, apples and carrots also play a large role on this feast in various countries. Other ideas: make an angel food cake, devil’s food cake or angel hair pasta. Decorate with white, symbolizing the angels, or use other symbolic colors (see above). Non-dessert items: deviled eggs, deviled meats, etc.
  • Try to find the Michaelmas daisy, a purple aster, to use for decoration. It also comes in other colors, including white, but purple is the most popular. It usually blooms in late summer until October. The official name is Aster novi-belgii, but is also known as New York aster. If you find plants or seeds to plan for next year’s garden. This site has photos and gardening information for the Michaelmas daisy.
  • Folklore in the British Isles suggests that Michaelmas day is the last day that blackberries can be picked. It is said that when St. Michael expelled Lucifer, the devil, from heaven, he fell from the skies and landed in a prickly blackberry bush. Satan cursed the fruit, scorched them with his fiery breath, and stamped and spat on them, so that they would be unfit for eating. A Traditional Irish proverb says:
    On Michaelmas Day the devil puts his foot on the blackberries.If you have access to blackberries, make this the last picking and eating. Perhaps make a blackberry pie? See Michaelmas Pie for a great recipe.

 

The Word Among Us

Meditation: John 1:47-51

Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael, Archangels (Feast)

You will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man. (John 1:51)

When you think about the future, how do you feel? If you’re looking forward to a family wedding or the arrival of a new baby, you might be very excited. If you’re not sure you have enough cash to cover your bills next month or you’re awaiting the results of a high-stakes medical test, you might be anxious. Our view of the future is often colored by what we are experiencing in the present.

Our hope in the future with God in heaven is also affected by what we believe now. After Nathanael’s declaration that Jesus was the “Son of God” and the “King of Israel,” Jesus said Nathanael would one day see him in glory surrounded by the angels in heaven (John 1:49). That privileged glimpse into the future was predicated on the present—Nathanael’s belief in Jesus.

Nathanael could make that statement of faith because he was so amazed that Jesus saw into his heart, even though they had just met. In that moment, Nathanael knew he was known and loved by God.

That’s why it’s important for us to continually reaffirm our faith. If we doubt that Jesus knows us as well as he knew Nathanael, or if we wonder how he could love us, then we may not be so sure that we will even make it to heaven. We may even think we don’t deserve to live with Jesus forever.

So follow Nathanael’s lead and make your own declaration of faith. Every day, repeat to yourself, “God has known me before I was born. He loves me more than anyone else could. He longs to spend eternity with me.”

Over time, as you internalize these truths, your perspective on the future will change. You’ll begin to look forward to that day in heaven when you finally see Jesus face-to-face. Can you imagine standing before the throne of God, with his angels and archangels “ascending and descending,” just as Jesus promised (John 1:51)?

Heaven is filled with God’s saints and angels, and God wants you to join them. For us who believe, the future couldn’t look brighter!

“Lord, I want to spend eternity with you.”

Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14
Psalm 138:1-5

——————————————————————————————————————————————-

Daily Gospel CommentaryCatechism of the Catholic Church
328-332“The angels of God ascend and descend on the Son of Man”“I believe in one God…, Creator of heaven and earth, and of all that is, visible and invisible.” The existence of the spiritual, non-corporeal beings that Sacred Scripture usually calls “angels” is a truth of faith. The witness of Scripture is as clear as the unanimity of Tradition. St. Augustine says: “‘Angel’ is the name of their office, not of their nature. If you seek the name of their nature, it is ‘spirit’; if you seek the name of their office, it is ‘angel’: from what they are, ‘spirit’, from what they do, ‘angel.'” With their whole beings the angels are servants and messengers of God. Because they “always behold the face of my Father who is in heaven” (Mt 18:10),they are the “mighty ones who do his word, hearkening to the voice of his word” (Ps 103:20). As purely spiritual creatures angels have intelligence and will: they are personal and immortal creatures, surpassing in perfection all visible creatures, as the splendor of their glory bears witness (cf Dan 10:9).Christ is the center of the angelic world. They are his angels: “When the Son of man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him” (Mt 25:31). They belong to him because they were created through and for him: “for in him all things were created in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or authorities – all things were created through him and for him,” (Col 1:16). They belong to him still more because he has made them messengers of his saving plan: “Are they not all ministering spirits sent forth to serve, for the sake of those who are to obtain salvation?” (Heb 1:14).

Angels have been present since creation and throughout the history of salvation, announcing this salvation from afar or near and serving the accomplishment of the divine plan.


CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Saturday, September 29

Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Feast of Sts. Michael, Gabriel, and
Raphael, archangels. They are the only angels
honored by name by the Church. Tradition holds that
we can look to Michael for help to repel Satan,
especially at the hour of death.

—————————————————————–

Regnum Christi

September 29, 2018 – Angelic Company

Feast of Saint Michael, Saint Gabriel and Saint Raphael, Archangels

John 1: 47-51

 

Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Here is a true Israelite. There is no duplicity in him.” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.” Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.” And he said to him, “Amen, amen, I say to you, you will see the sky opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.”

 

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I approach this time of prayer earnestly. I believe that you have called me to be faithful and loving in your service. I thank you along with Mary, the saints and the holy angels for the marvelous works of creation. I will humbly try to reflect your greatness to all I meet today by honestly fulfilling my duty.

Petition: Lord, help me be an instrument of your peace and love.

  1. Honesty Is the Best Policy: Once as Jesus spent the whole night in prayer, he searched for apostles that would be honest and sincere. Jesus took a liking to Nathanael when he discovered an Israelite without guile in his heart. Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Here is a true Israelite. There is no duplicity in him. It seems that Jesus admired this angelic trait in men. As soon as he saw Philip bringing Nathanael forward to meet him, Jesus immediately noticed the virtue Nathanael lived. If I want to be highly thought of by Jesus, then I need to be sincere in mind and heart.
  1. The Holy Angels: The Church venerates today the holy service of three of the archangels. They stand out for their honest love for God’s most holy will. With such fidelity, St. Gabriel faithfully delivered the most important messages of human history to Zacharias and Mary. St. Michael wrestled with Lucifer and cast him out of heaven. St. Raphael came to the aid of Tobias in the Old Testament. In these angels there isn’t any duplicity of heart. God asks them a favor and they truly fulfill it. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to implement our talents and gifts toward a service of this nature? Wouldn’t it be great to be honest instruments of God’s infinite love like these three archangels?
  1. The Lord’s Gaze: Jesus looks into the heart and doesn’t judge by appearances. Christ’s gaze penetrated Nathanael on this occasion. Jesus penetrates the motives of my heart even though they are kept hidden from the others. Jesus is the first one to know if I am true to the faith I have received. If I am faithful to the dictates of my conscience and obey God’s lead, in private or in public, then I have nothing to hide and nothing to lose. If on the other hand, I am dwindling in my surrender to Christ by boredom and monotony, then it is about time I sought renewal. Christ needs me! How many are dying and fading away because they lack Christ and his love? I, in turn, have been graced by many special spiritual favors! Jesus gazes into my eyes and dreams of my fidelity and love.

Conversation with Christ: Lord, thank you for the example of these three archangels and of the holy apostles. The holy apostles ended up shedding their blood for you and the holy angels aid us on our journey towards you. Lord, seeing so many lacking the faith, I resolve to be your tireless instrument, like them, so that many may come to praise you for all eternity.

Resolution: I will visit the Eucharist (if this is impossible, then kneel before the crucifix) and repeat confidently, Lord I wish to be your instrument – help me!


One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Espanol

All Issues > Volume 34, Issue 5

<< Saturday, September 29, 2018 >> Sts. Michael, Gabriel & Raphael, Archangels
 
Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14 or
Revelation 12:7-12

View Readings
Psalm 138:1-5 John 1:47-51
Similar Reflections
 

THE GOLDEN ARCH AROUND JESUS

 
“As the visions during the night continued, I saw One like a Son of Man coming, on the clouds of heaven; when He reached the Ancient One and was presented before Him, He received dominion, glory, and kingship.” �Daniel 7:13-14
 
In a vision, Daniel saw God’s throne in heaven. “Thousands upon thousands were ministering to Him, and myriads upon myriads attended Him” (Dn 7:10). Angels surround God’s throne and worship Him forever.

Jesus told Nathanael: “I solemnly assure you, you shall see the sky opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man” (Jn 1:51). Angels surround Jesus and center their activity on Him. The angels center on Jesus as they center on God’s throne. Angels are by definition “messengers.” All their messages are directed to the ultimate message: “JESUS CHRIST IS LORD,” that is, God (Phil 2:11).

John, like Daniel, saw “an open door to heaven” (Rv 4:1). He saw God’s throne, and he “heard the voices of every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea; everything in the universe cried aloud: ‘To the One seated on the throne, and to the Lamb, be praise and honor, glory and might, forever and ever!’ ” (Rv 5:13) Jesus is the Lamb of God, Who is God. All angels and all creation exist to worship Him.

Like the angels, we should always think of ourselves on the periphery and Jesus as the Center, Lord, and God. “In the presence of the angels” (Ps 138:1), worship Jesus.

 
Prayer: Father, in the Holy Spirit, I throw my life at Jesus’ feet and worship Him.
Promise: “Now have salvation and power come, the reign of our God and the authority of His Anointed One.” —Rv 12:10
Praise: Teenage Warren played the part of St. Raphael in a play. Before the production, Warren prayed a novena to St. Raphael asking for the grace to touch hearts through the performances.

 

Saint Thomas, Apostle

<em>Saint Thomas</em> | Georges de La TourImage: Saint Thomas | Georges de La Tour

Saint Thomas the Apostle

Saint of the Day for July 3

(1st Century – December 21, 72)

 

 

Saint Thomas the Apostle’s Story

Poor Thomas! He made one remark and has been branded as “Doubting Thomas” ever since. But if he doubted, he also believed. He made what is certainly the most explicit statement of faith in the New Testament: “My Lord and My God!” and, in so expressing his faith, gave Christians a prayer that will be said till the end of time. He also occasioned a compliment from Jesus to all later Christians: “Have you come to believe because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and have believed” (John 20:29).

Thomas should be equally well-known for his courage. Perhaps what he said was impetuous—since he ran, like the rest, at the showdown—but he can scarcely have been insincere when he expressed his willingness to die with Jesus. The occasion was when Jesus proposed to go to Bethany after Lazarus had died. Since Bethany was near Jerusalem, this meant walking into the very midst of his enemies and to almost certain death. Realizing this, Thomas said to the other apostles, “Let us also go to die with him” (John 11:16b).


Reflection

Thomas shares the lot of Peter the impetuous, James and John, the “sons of thunder,” Philip and his foolish request to see the Father—indeed all the apostles in their weakness and lack of understanding. We must not exaggerate these facts, however, for Christ did not pick worthless men. But their human weakness again points up the fact that holiness is a gift of God, not a human creation; it is given to ordinary men and women with weaknesses; it is God who gradually transforms the weaknesses into the image of Christ, the courageous, trusting, and loving one.


Saint Thomas the Apostle is the Patron Saint of:

Architects
Argentina
Construction Workers
Cooks

Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Jesus

The Most Holy Name of Jesus

Cathedral of the Most Holy Name, Mumbai, India

Christ teaching the Lord’s Prayer

AD ca. 1200
Miniature on vellum
Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague

IHS monogram, on top of the main altar of the Gesù, Rome

January 3 – Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Jesus

The Story of the Most Holy Name of Jesus

Although Saint Paul might claim credit for promoting devotion to the Holy Name because Paul wrote in Philippians that God the Father gave Christ Jesus “that name that is above every name” (see 2:9), this devotion became popular because of 12th-century Cistercian monks and nuns but especially through the preaching of Saint Bernardine of Siena, a 15th-century Franciscan.

Bernardine used devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus as a way of overcoming bitter and often bloody class struggles and family rivalries or vendettas in Italian city-states. The devotion grew, partly because of Franciscan and Dominican preachers. It spread even more widely after the Jesuits began promoting it in the 16th century.

In 1530, Pope Clement V approved an Office of the Holy Name for the Franciscans. In 1721, Pope Innocent XIII extended this feast to the entire Church.


Reflection

Jesus died and rose for the sake of all people. No one can trademark or copyright Jesus’ name. Jesus is the Son of God and son of Mary. Everything that exists was created in and through the Son of God (see Colossians 1:15-20). The name of Jesus is debased if any Christian uses it as justification for berating non-Christians. Jesus reminds us that because we are all related to him we are, therefore, all related to one another.


franciscanmedia.org


IHS monogram, with kneeling angels, atop the main altar
Church of the Gesù, Rome.

Feast of
the Holy Name of Jesus

Luke 2:21 “…Et vocatum est Nomen eius IESUS”
(“And His Name was called JESUS”)

Psalm 90:14 “Because he hoped in me I will deliver him:
I will protect him because he hath known My Name.”

Zacharias 10:12 “I will strengthen them in the Lord,
and they shall walk in His Name, saith the Lord.”

Apocalypse 3:8 “I know thy works. Behold, I have given before thee a door opened, which no man can shut: because thou hast a little strength, and hast kept my word, and hast not denied My Name.”

Apocalypse 15:4 “Who shall not fear Thee, O Lord, and magnify Thy Name?…”

Blessed be the most holy Name of Jesus without end!

January Devotion: The Holy Name of Jesus

The month of January is traditionally dedicated to the Holy Name of Jesus. This feast is also celebrated on January 3. Here is an explanation of the devotion.

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has associated entire months to special devotions. The devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus has been traditionally associated with the month of January, due to its celebration on January 3. The name Jesus was given to the Holy Child at God’s command (Luke 1:31). The Holy Name is all-powerful because of the Person who bears it; we honor it because of the command of Christ, that we should pray in His Name and because it reminds us of all the blessings we receive through our Holy Redeemer. Hence St. Paul was able to write to the Philippians: “. . . at the name of Jesus every knee should bend of those in heaven, on earth, and under the earth” (Phil. 2:10). By means of this devotion we also make amends for improper use of the Holy Name.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O’Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Prayer/Hymn in Honor of the Most Holy Name of Jesus – Iesu, Dulcis Memoria

Iesu, Dulcis Memoria is a celebrated 12th century hymn attributed to St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153), Doctor Mellifluus. The entire hymn has some 42 to 53 stanzas depending upon the manuscript. Parts of this hymn were used for the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus, which was formerly celebrated on the Sunday between the Circumcision and Epiphany, or failing such a Sunday, on January 2. The part below was used at Vespers. In the liturgical revisions of Vatican II, the feast was deleted, though a votive Mass to the Holy Name of Jesus had been retained for devotional use. With the release of the revised Roman Missal in March 2002, the feast was restored as an optional memorial on January 3.

Jesus, the very thought of Thee
With sweetness fills the breast!
Yet sweeter far Thy face to see
And in Thy presence rest.

No voice can sing, no heart can frame,
Nor can the memory find,
A sweeter sound than Jesus’ name,
The Savior of mankind.

O hope of every contrite heart!
0 joy of all the meek!
To those who fall, how kind Thou art!
How good to those who seek!

But what to those who find? Ah! this
Nor tongue nor pen can show
The love of Jesus, what it is,
None but His loved ones know.

Jesus! our only hope be Thou,
As Thou our prize shalt be;
In Thee be all our glory now,
And through eternity. Amen.

Roman Breviary

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O’Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

O Divine Jesus, Thou hast promised that anything we ask of the Eternal Father in Thy name shall be granted.

O Eternal Father. In the name of Jesus, for the love of Jesus, in fulfillment of this promise, and because Jesus has said it, grant us our petitions for the sake of Jesus, Thy Divine Son. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O’Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

That at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Phil:2:10-11

The Most Holy Name
The Power of Jesus’ Name
What does IHS stand for? The meaning of the Holy Name of Jesus [Catholic Caucus]
Litany Of The Holy Name of Jesus
Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
Jesus, The Name above all Names
Devotion to the Holy Name (of Jesus) [Catholic Caucus]
Lessons In Iconography : The Chi Rho – Christ
St. Francis de Sales on the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Excerpt from a Sermon) (Catholic Caucus)
St. Francis de Sales on the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

St. Bernard on the Most Holy Name of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Saving the day in His Holy Name: St. Genevieve gets a reprieve [Catholic Caucus]
The Holy Name of Jesus
Holy Name of Jesus [San Bernadino of Siena] Ecumenical
The Holy Name of Jesus
Devotion to the Holy Name [of Jesus]
The Name of Jesus: Its Power in Our Lives
The Holy Name of Jesus
Devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus
The Holy Name of Jesus

Philippians 2
9 Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name which is above every name,
10 that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Most Holy Name of Jesus

Franciscan Media

IHS monogram, on top of the main altar of the Gesù, Rome, Italy | JastrowImage: IHS monogram, on top of the main altar of the Gesù, Rome, Italy | Jastrow

Most Holy Name of Jesus

Saint of the Day for January 3

 

The Story of the Most Holy Name of Jesus

Although Saint Paul might claim credit for promoting devotion to the Holy Name because Paul wrote in Philippians that God the Father gave Christ Jesus “that name that is above every name” (see 2:9), this devotion became popular because of 12th-century Cistercian monks and nuns but especially through the preaching of Saint Bernardine of Siena, a 15th-century Franciscan.

Bernardine used devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus as a way of overcoming bitter and often bloody class struggles and family rivalries or vendettas in Italian city-states. The devotion grew, partly because of Franciscan and Dominican preachers. It spread even more widely after the Jesuits began promoting it in the 16th century.

In 1530, Pope Clement V approved an Office of the Holy Name for the Franciscans. In 1721, Pope Innocent XIII extended this feast to the entire Church.


Reflection

Jesus died and rose for the sake of all people. No one can trademark or copyright Jesus’ name. Jesus is the Son of God and son of Mary. Everything that exists was created in and through the Son of God (see Colossians 1:15-20). The name of Jesus is debased if any Christian uses it as justification for berating non-Christians. Jesus reminds us that because we are all related to him we are, therefore, all related to one another.

Catholic Culture

Christmas: January 3rd

Optional Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Jesus

MASS READINGS

January 03, 2018 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

O God, who founded the salvation of the human race on the Incarnation of your Word, give your peoples the mercy they implore, so that all may know there is no other name to be invoked but the Name of your Only Begotten Son. Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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Today the Church celebrates the optional memorial of the Most Holy Name of Jesus. According to the 1962 Missal of St. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite this feast is celebrated on January 2. In the liturgical revisions of Vatican II, the feast was removed, though a votive Mass to the Holy Name of Jesus had been retained for devotional use. With the release of the revised Roman Missal in March 2002, the feast was restored as an optional memorial in the Ordinary Form on January 3.

The Church reveals to us the wonders of the Incarnate Word by singing the glories of His name. The name of Jesus means Savior; it had been shown in a dream to Joseph together with its meaning and to Our Lady at the annunciation by the Archangel Gabriel.

Devotion to the Holy Name is deeply rooted in the Sacred Scriptures, especially in the Acts of the Apostles. It was promoted in a special manner by St. Bernard, St. Bernardine of Siena, St. John Capistrano and by the Franciscan Order. It was extended to the whole Church in 1727 during the pontificate of Innocent XIII. The month of January has traditionally been dedicated to the Holy Name of Jesus.

According to the 1962 Missal of Bl. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, the feast of the Holy Name of Jesus which is kept on the First Sunday in the year; but if this Sunday falls on January 1, 6, or 7, the feast is kept on January 2.

The Tenth Day of Christmas

Holy Name of Jesus
This feast marks no progress in the development of the Church year. It merely embellishes the occasion just observed when the Child received the Name Jesus as had been foretold by the angel. The feast is meant to impress on us Christians the dignity of the Holy Name. It is a relatively new feast, stemming out of devotional piety. Nevertheless, it is not difficult to find in it some liturgical or ancient Christian dogma. What did a name signify originally? The name should express the nature of a thing. Thus Adam in paradise gave the animals names in accordance with their being. Among the Jews God’s name expressed His essence, Yahweh, i.e., I (alone) am who am (and cause all else to be). The Jews had the highest respect for the name of God, a reverence that finds continuation in the Our Father: “Hallowed be Thy Name.”

Persons who played prominent roles in the history of salvation often received their names from God Himself. Adam — man of the earth; Eve — mother of all the living; Abraham — father of many nations; Peter — the rock. The Savior’s precursor was given the name God assigned him. According to divine precedent, then, the name of the Redeemer should not be accidental, of human choosing, but given by God Himself. For His name should express His mission. We read in Sacred Scripture how the angel Gabriel revealed that name to Mary: “You shall call His name Jesus.” And to St. Joseph the angel not merely revealed the name but explained its meaning: “You shall call His name Jesus, for He shall save His people from their sins.” The Messiah should not only be the savior, but should be called Savior. With Jesus, therefore, the name actually tells the purpose of His existence. This is why we must esteem His name as sacred. Whenever we pronounce it, we ought to bow our heads; for the very name reminds us of the greatest favor we have ever received, salvation.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

His name was called Jesus, which was called by the Angel before He was conceived in the womb.” LUKE ii. 21.

1. It is not difficult to meditate upon the Holy Name, or to use the Holy Name in prayer. More than any other name, perhaps alone among all proper names, it is appropriate to the One Who owned it. Usually the names of men are given at random; they mean nothing in themselves; a man who happens to be called John might just as well have been called Thomas or William; the mere name tells us nothing about him; it is a convenient means of distinguishing him from others, a label put upon him and little or no more With a few human beings it has been otherwise: Adam, Abraham, Josue, John the Baptist were given names that signified the men on whom they were bestowed. But with none is this so true as it is with our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. With care the Angel impressed it on His Mother’s mind: “Thou shalt call His name Jesus,” he said, and there followed the description of His future greatness. With care it was repeated to Joseph: Thou shalt call His name Jesus, for He shall save His people from their sins.

2. The Name stands as a complete summary and description of our Lord’s character and office, and it is under this aspect that it has been regarded by thousands of saints, whose hearts have melted at its mere sound. To them Jesus is their God, Jesus is their King, Jesus is their Redeemer, Jesus is their Mediator, Jesus is their Saviour, Jesus is their great Priest, Jesus is their Intercessor, Jesus is the Captain under Whom they fight, Jesus is the Leader Whom they follow, Jesus is their Teacher, Jesus is the Giver of their law, Jesus is the Spouse and Shepherd of their souls, Jesus is their Light, Jesus is their Life, Jesus is the Judge before Whom they rejoice to think that they must one day stand, Jesus is their final and eternal Reward, for which alone they live.

3. But He is also to them the mirror of all the most glorious and winning virtues. He is, and His Name tells them that He is, unbounded Charity, infinite Mercy, extremest Kindness, deepest Humility, most devoted Piety, transparent Simplicity, uttermost Poverty, Chastity without a stain. It is the prerogative of love to transform those who love into the likeness of Him Whom they love; and as the mere name of one who is loved cannot sound in the ear or be thought of in the mind without adding to the love which is already there, so the thought of the Holy Name and the mention of the Holy Name have a kind of sacramental power in the hearts of His saints. They seem to convey the grace which enables men to think like Him, to speak like Him, to act like Him, to sacrifice themselves like Him, and to Him, and for Him, and along with Him, to make Him known to others, not by word only, but also by reproduction of Him in themselves, and to win all men to love Him.

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and let all that is within thee bless His Holy Name. Bless the Lord, O my soul, and never forget all He hath done for thee. Ps. cii. i, 2.

1. The great saint of the Holy Name is St. Bernardine of Siena. In his missionary expeditions he carried it on a banner, and used it continually in his sermons. He has a long treatise on the Holy Name, which teems with matter for prayer. The Holy Name, he says, is first of all fruitful for beginners. For these, for sinners, ” it shows the immense mercifulness of God, it enables a devout man to gain a victory in every conflict, whether with the devil, the flesh, or the world, it has the power of healing sickness when rightly used, it fills with joy and exultation those who are in any adversity.” He quotes St. Peter, that “through His name all receive remission of sin who believe in Him”; St. John : “Your sins are forgiven you for His name’s sake”; St. Peter again: “There is no other name under heaven given to men whereby we must be saved”; the prayer of the Church in the Acts of the Apostles, that God would “stretch forth his hand to signs and cures and wonders, to be done by the name of thy only Son Jesus”; the further statement in the Acts, that the Apostles went forth “from the presence of the Council, rejoicing that they were accounted worthy to suffer reproach for the name of Jesus.”

2. Next it is fruitful for the proficient. “It is cherished in their hearts and fed upon by faith, it is taken into their mouths and preached or spoken about, it is made the spring of their actions, which then become a great accumulation of merits, it is appropriated in a new way by perseverance, and then it becomes a principle of abiding and enduring life, the remedy of the frailty and fickleness which belong to our poor nature.”

By virtue of this Holy Name, he tells us, we ourselves have become the sons of God. In the virtue of this Holy Name St. Paul placed all his hope of doing good. The power of the Holy Name is the power of the Holy Ghost. And for its power of endurance he asks: “Art thou not refreshed as often as thou rememberest the name of Jesus? What is there equal to it for the feeding of the mind that thinks of it, for repairing weariness, for strengthening virtues, for nourishing good and upright ways, for fostering true affections?”

3. Lastly it is fruitful for those whom he calls the perfect. The first fruit is “the sweetness with which those who meditate upon it are filled,” according to the beautiful rhythm of St. Bernard, Jesu dulcis memoria. The second is the wonderful power which this Holy Name gives to the prayers and petitions of the devout soul. The third is the immense sweetness which it gives to those who continually renew its memory. The fourth is the triumph and glory which it will produce in eternity: “They shall glory in Thee, all who love Thy name/ And thus for the sake of the name of Jesus the whole soul will live, and be endowed and enriched and beautified with all its powers; it will be made like to God three and one, united to Him, enlightened by Him, and plunged in perfect peace through Him, for it is to live for ever in the state of perfect bliss, furnished with the accumulation of all good.”

Excerpted from The Prince of Peace by Alban Goodier

Things to Do:


Saint Luke, Evangelist

Franciscan Media

 

<em>The Apostle Luke</em> | Andrey MironovImage: The Apostle Luke | Andrey Mironov

Saint Luke

Saint of the Day for October 18

(d. c. 84)

 

 

Saint Luke’s Story

Luke wrote one of the major portions of the New Testament, a two-volume work comprising the third Gospel and Acts of the Apostles. In the two books he shows the parallel between the life of Christ and that of the Church. He is the only Gentile Christian among the Gospel writers. Tradition holds him to be a native of Antioch, and Paul calls him “our beloved physician.” His Gospel was probably written between 70 and 85 A.D.

Luke appears in Acts during Paul’s second journey, remains at Philippi for several years until Paul returns from his third journey, accompanies Paul to Jerusalem, and remains near him when he is imprisoned in Caesarea. During these two years, Luke had time to seek information and interview persons who had known Jesus. He accompanied Paul on the dangerous journey to Rome where he was a faithful companion.

Luke’s unique character may best be seen by the emphases of his Gospel, which has been given a number of subtitles:
1) The Gospel of Mercy
2) The Gospel of Universal Salvation
3) The Gospel of the Poor
4) The Gospel of Absolute Renunciation
5) The Gospel of Prayer and the Holy Spirit
6) The Gospel of Joy


Reflection

Luke wrote as a Gentile for Gentile Christians. His Gospel and Acts of the Apostles reveal his expertise in classic Greek style as well as his knowledge of Jewish sources. There is a warmth to Luke’s writing that sets it apart from that of the other synoptic Gospels, and yet it beautifully complements those works. The treasure of the Scriptures is a true gift of the Holy Spirit to the Church.


Saint Luke is the Patron Saint of:

Artists/Painters
Brewers
Butchers
Notaries
Physicians/Surgeons


For more on Saint Luke, click here!

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