Tag Archives: cristero

St. Mateo Correa Magallanes (Cristero/KofC)

St. Christopher Magallanes and Companions
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“Long live Christ the King and the Virgin of Guadalupe!”

This was the slogan of the “Cristero” uprising in the 1920’s against the anti-Catholic government of Mexico which had instituted and enforced laws against the Church in an absurd attempt to eradicate the Catholic faith in Mexico, even going so far as to ban all foreign clergy and the celebration of Mass in some regions.

St. Christopher Magallanes, along with 21 other priests and three lay companions, were martyred between 1915 and 1937, by shooting or hanging, throughout eight Mexican states, for their membership in the Cristero movement. Magallanes erected a seminary in Totatiche and he and his companions secretly preached and ministered to the faithful.

The last words heard spoken by Magallanes were from his cell, when he shouted, “I am innocent and I die innocent. I forgive with all my heart those responsible for my death, and I ask God that the shedding of my blood serve the peace of our divided Mexico”.

Pope John Paul II beatified the Cristero martyrs in 1992 and canonized them in 2000.


http://www.kofc.org/en/mexican-martyrs/st-mateo.html

http://www.kofc.org/un/en/mexican-martyrs/index.html


 

The Cristeros – the Mexican Martyrs

Father Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero (Cristero)

St. Father Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero

http://www.kofc.org/en/mexican-martyrs/st-pedro.html

The Cristeros – the Mexican Martyrs

Convention Greetings

St. Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero

Knights of Columbus Council 2419

Chihuahua, México

Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero was born in Chihuahua, Chihuahua, on June 15, 1892. When he was 17 years old, he entered the conciliar seminary of that diocese. Cheerful, friendly and kind, he is remembered by his classmates for his exemplary behavior and dedication to his studies.

The suppression of the seminary in 1914 sent him back home. With the political situation in Mexico, he left to study for the priesthood in El Paso, Texas where he was ordained on Jan. 25, 1918.

Depite the risk, he returned to Chihuahua to serve in  San Nicolás de Carretas. His arrival at the parish coincided with a terrible epidemic. Without concern for his personal health, he came to the spiritual and material aid of those affected.

In January 1924, he served as parish priest of Santa Isabel in Chihuahua, where he enthusiastically took charge of the children’s Sunday school and won over the adults with songs and theatrical performances. He restored associations that had gone out of existence, founded new apostolic groups, and ignited the enthusiasm and Eucharistic piety of his parishioners.

During the religious persecution, Father Maldonado decided to remain with his own people. In 1929, President Plutarco Elías Calles accepted the so-called agreements with Mexican bishops. The churches could go back to celebrating Mass, and those known as Cristeros, who had fought to defend their rights, surrendered their weapons. However, the government did not honor the agreements and continued to persecute Catholics in various degrees in the decades that followed. In Chihuahua anticlericalism worsened starting in 1931.

In 1934, government authorities deported Father Maldonado from Santa Isabel to El Paso, Texas. Undeterred, he returned to his parish as soon as he could, establishing himself in Boquilla del Río, less than two miles from Santa Isabel. On Feb. 10, 1937, Ash Wednesday, after hearing the confessions of  many churchgoers, he was captured by a group of drunk and armed men. He quickly took possession of the reliquary before his arrest. Walking barefoot and followed by a large contingent of the faithful, he was taken to Santa Isabel.

As soon as Father Maldonado was placed before the municipal mayor, the official grabbed him by the hair and hit him before taking him to see the region’s political boss, Andrés Rivera, who immediately gave him a tremendous blow to the head with his pistol fracturing the priest’s skull and dislodging  his left eye from its socket. Thrown to the floor, Father Maldonado was then attacked by government henchmen. Pressing the pyx against his chest, Father Maldonado fell, soaked in his own blood. The pyx also fell, opening and revealing the hosts. One executioner recognized the hosts, picked them up and cynically ordered the priest, “Eat this!”

Hours later, a group of the faithful took him to the civil hospital in the city of Chihuahua. He died early the next morning,  Feb. 11, 1937. His relics are kept in the Cathedral of Chihuahua.

Based on Canonización de Veintisiete Santos Mexicanos and the Vatican Website

Blessed Miguel Pro (Cristero)

Google Search

 

you can also watch the movie, “For Greater Glory


 

Cristeros

The Knights of Columbus Mexican Martyrs

History of the Knights of Columbus Mexican Martyrs

¡Viva Cristo Rey!

Christ the King Reigns

Brothers in Christ

Our Glorious Story

St. José María Robles Hurtado

St. Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero

Spiritual Heroes

‘A Great Apostle of Charity’

Saints of Service

Hermanos en Cristo

A Forgotten History is Preserved

In the Footsteps of a Martyr Knight

The Untold Story of the Knights during the Cristiada

La Cristiada: The Mexican People’s War for Religious Liberty

Knights of Columbus Martyrs of Mexico

What price would you pay for freedom?

For Greater Glory

St. José María Robles Hurtado — Priest, Martyr and Knight : A Special Heart With a Special Beat

Saints of Service

The saints and blesseds of the Knights of Columbus are models for the Columbian virtues of Charity, Unity, Fraternity and Patriotism

New Translation Tells ‘Forgotten History’ of Cristero Uprising
Father Pro: A Mexican Hero
The Cristeros and Us (George Weigel)

Movie on Cristeros War Exposes Mexican Govt.’s Anti-Christian Campaign
The Story, Martyrs, and Lessons of the Cristero War
When the Catholic Faith Was Outlawed

———————————————————————————-
Viva Cristo Rey!
For Greater Glory: The True Story of Cristeros (EWTN program on YouTube)
New Trailer for Cristeros Film

The Undercover Priest, Blessed Miguel Augustin Pro
The Martyrdom of Blessed Miguel Pro, S.J.
A Patron Saint for the Falsely Accused [Father Miguel Augustin Pro, S.J.]
Mexican “Cristeros” Martyrs Beatified

Blessed Miguel Pro:Heroic Mexican Martyr[“VIVA CRISTO REY!”]
Father Miguel Pro: Heroic Mexican Martyr
Blessed Miguel Pro [last dying words:”Viva El Cristo Rey”(“Long Live Christ The King”)]
For All the Saints: Christopher Magallanes and Companions, Martyrs (Mexican martyrs)

Father Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero (Cristero)

St. Father Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero

http://www.kofc.org/en/mexican-martyrs/st-pedro.html

 

The Cristeros – the Mexican Martyrs

 

Convention Greetings

St. Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero

Knights of Columbus Council 2419

Chihuahua, México

Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero was born in Chihuahua, Chihuahua, on June 15, 1892. When he was 17 years old, he entered the conciliar seminary of that diocese. Cheerful, friendly and kind, he is remembered by his classmates for his exemplary behavior and dedication to his studies.

The suppression of the seminary in 1914 sent him back home. With the political situation in Mexico, he left to study for the priesthood in El Paso, Texas where he was ordained on Jan. 25, 1918.

Depite the risk, he returned to Chihuahua to serve in  San Nicolás de Carretas. His arrival at the parish coincided with a terrible epidemic. Without concern for his personal health, he came to the spiritual and material aid of those affected.

In January 1924, he served as parish priest of Santa Isabel in Chihuahua, where he enthusiastically took charge of the children’s Sunday school and won over the adults with songs and theatrical performances. He restored associations that had gone out of existence, founded new apostolic groups, and ignited the enthusiasm and Eucharistic piety of his parishioners.

During the religious persecution, Father Maldonado decided to remain with his own people. In 1929, President Plutarco Elías Calles accepted the so-called agreements with Mexican bishops. The churches could go back to celebrating Mass, and those known as Cristeros, who had fought to defend their rights, surrendered their weapons. However, the government did not honor the agreements and continued to persecute Catholics in various degrees in the decades that followed. In Chihuahua anticlericalism worsened starting in 1931.

In 1934, government authorities deported Father Maldonado from Santa Isabel to El Paso, Texas. Undeterred, he returned to his parish as soon as he could, establishing himself in Boquilla del Río, less than two miles from Santa Isabel. On Feb. 10, 1937, Ash Wednesday, after hearing the confessions of  many churchgoers, he was captured by a group of drunk and armed men. He quickly took possession of the reliquary before his arrest. Walking barefoot and followed by a large contingent of the faithful, he was taken to Santa Isabel.

As soon as Father Maldonado was placed before the municipal mayor, the official grabbed him by the hair and hit him before taking him to see the region’s political boss, Andrés Rivera, who immediately gave him a tremendous blow to the head with his pistol fracturing the priest’s skull and dislodging  his left eye from its socket. Thrown to the floor, Father Maldonado was then attacked by government henchmen. Pressing the pyx against his chest, Father Maldonado fell, soaked in his own blood. The pyx also fell, opening and revealing the hosts. One executioner recognized the hosts, picked them up and cynically ordered the priest, “Eat this!”

Hours later, a group of the faithful took him to the civil hospital in the city of Chihuahua. He died early the next morning,  Feb. 11, 1937. His relics are kept in the Cathedral of Chihuahua.

Based on Canonización de Veintisiete Santos Mexicanos and the Vatican Website

Blessed Miguel Pro (Cristero)

Google Search

 

you can also watch the movie, “For Greater Glory


 

Cristeros

The Knights of Columbus Mexican Martyrs

History of the Knights of Columbus Mexican Martyrs

¡Viva Cristo Rey!

Christ the King Reigns

Brothers in Christ

Our Glorious Story

St. José María Robles Hurtado

St. Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero

Spiritual Heroes

‘A Great Apostle of Charity’

Saints of Service

Hermanos en Cristo

A Forgotten History is Preserved

In the Footsteps of a Martyr Knight

The Untold Story of the Knights during the Cristiada

La Cristiada: The Mexican People’s War for Religious Liberty

Knights of Columbus Martyrs of Mexico

What price would you pay for freedom?

For Greater Glory

St. José María Robles Hurtado — Priest, Martyr and Knight : A Special Heart With a Special Beat

Saints of Service

The saints and blesseds of the Knights of Columbus are models for the Columbian virtues of Charity, Unity, Fraternity and Patriotism

New Translation Tells ‘Forgotten History’ of Cristero Uprising
Father Pro: A Mexican Hero
The Cristeros and Us (George Weigel)

Movie on Cristeros War Exposes Mexican Govt.’s Anti-Christian Campaign
The Story, Martyrs, and Lessons of the Cristero War
When the Catholic Faith Was Outlawed

———————————————————————————-
Viva Cristo Rey!
For Greater Glory: The True Story of Cristeros (EWTN program on YouTube)
New Trailer for Cristeros Film

The Undercover Priest, Blessed Miguel Augustin Pro
The Martyrdom of Blessed Miguel Pro, S.J.
A Patron Saint for the Falsely Accused [Father Miguel Augustin Pro, S.J.]
Mexican “Cristeros” Martyrs Beatified

Blessed Miguel Pro:Heroic Mexican Martyr[“VIVA CRISTO REY!”]
Father Miguel Pro: Heroic Mexican Martyr
Blessed Miguel Pro [last dying words:”Viva El Cristo Rey”(“Long Live Christ The King”)]
For All the Saints: Christopher Magallanes and Companions, Martyrs (Mexican martyrs)