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Solemnity of All Saints

November 1

|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every year that begins at 12:00am on of November, repeating indefinitely

Mass at 12 pm, 7 pm, 8 pm Spanish

Solemnity of All Saints

Fr. Don Miller, OFM

Evening of All Saints' Day at Malmi Cemetery, Helsinki, Finland | photo by Jori Samonen | flickrImage: Evening of All Saints’ Day at Malmi Cemetery, Helsinki, Finland | photo by Jori Samonen | flickr

Solemnity of All Saints

Saint of the Day for November 1

 

The Story of the Solemnity of All Saints

The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of “all the martyrs.” In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagon-loads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended “that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons” (On the Calculation of Time).

But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost.

How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.


Reflection

This feast first honored martyrs. Later, when Christians were free to worship according to their consciences, the Church acknowledged other paths to sanctity. In the early centuries the only criterion was popular acclaim, even when the bishop’s approval became the final step in placing a commemoration on the calendar. The first papal canonization occurred in 993; the lengthy process now required to prove extraordinary sanctity took form in the last 500 years. Today’s feast honors the obscure as well as the famous—the saints each of us have known.


Holy Spirit Interactive Kids:  A Saint a Day

All Saints Day

Feast Day: November 1

This feast day grew out of the love and devotion of God’s people. The Church chose this feast to honor God in His saints, in whom He has shown Himself so wonderful. We thank God as the creator of all holiness and for the graces He has showered upon them.

The communion of saints is made up of all true children of God. They may belong to:

  • the militant Church on earth

  • the suffering Church in purgatory or

  • the triumphant Church in heaven

    Some saints needed to pass through purgatory to be purified before they were fit for the Lord’s presence. They stayed there until they were ready to see God. They are with him now forever.

    A few saints have their own feast day but as there are not enough days in the year we cannot celebrate a special day for each of the saints.

    Some stayed close to God all their lives. Others found Him along the way. Some led good lives without too much difficulty. Others made big mistakes, but were truly sorry for their sins and drew close to God.

    They made it! We celebrate their journey that led to eternal happiness with God. We celebrate our own family members, relatives, neighbors and friends whom we believe are in heaven.

    Today we can rejoice in our hearts with all the saints in heaven. We can make up our own prayer to them, thanking them for the witness of their lives.

    We can thank them too, for helping us overcome our difficulties and temptations. We ask them to help us on our own journey through life so we can be saints like them and go to heaven.


  • CATHOLIC ALMANAC

    Wednesday, November 1

    Liturgical Color: White

    Today is the Solemnity of All
    Saints. The Church uses this day to
    honor all the saints in heaven,
    including those that remain unknown
    to us. Pope Gregory IV extended this
    solemnity to the whole Church in the
    9th century.


Catholic Culture

Ordinary Time: November 1st

Solemnity of All Saints

MASS READINGS

November 01, 2017 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

Almighty ever-living God, by whose gift we venerate in one celebration the merits of all the Saints, bestow on us, we pray, through the prayers of so many intercessors, an abundance of the reconciliation with you for which we earnestly long. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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Recipes (16)

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Activities (9)

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Prayers (7)

  • November Devotion: The Holy Souls in Purgatory
  • Litany of the Saints
  • Little Litany of the Holy Souls
  • Prayer for a Happy Death
  • Daily Acceptance of Death
  • Roman Ritual: Litany of the Saints
  • A Prayer to All The Saints, November 1Old Calendar: Feast of All Saints ; Other Titles: All Saints DayToday the Church celebrates all the saints: canonized or beatified, and the multitude of those who are in heaven enjoying the beatific vision that are only known to God. During the early centuries the Saints venerated by the Church were all martyrs. Later on the Popes set November 1 as the day for commemorating all the Saints. We all have this “universal call to holiness.” What must we to do in order to join the company of the saints in heaven? We “must follow in His footsteps and conform [our]selves to His image seeking the will of the Father in all things. [We] must devote [our]selves with all [our] being to the glory of God and the service of [our] neighbor. In this way, the holiness of the People of God will grow into an abundant harvest of good, as is admirably shown by the life of so many saints in Church history” (Lumen Gentium, 40).Don’t forget to pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory from November 1 to the 8th.

    All Saints Day
    During the year the Church celebrates one by one the feasts of the saints. Today she joins them all in one festival. In addition to those whose names she knows, she recalls in a magnificent vision all the others “of all nations and tribes standing before the throne and in sight of the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands, proclaiming Him who redeemed them in His Blood.”

    The feast of All Saints should inspire us with tremendous hope. Among the saints in heaven are some whom we have known. All lived on earth lives like our own. They were baptized, marked with the sign of faith, they were faithful to Christ’s teaching and they have gone before us to the heavenly home whence they call on us to follow them. The Gospel of the Beatitudes, read today, while it shows their happiness, shows, too, the road that they followed; there is no other that will lead us whither they have gone.

    “The Commemoration of All Saints” was first celebrated in the East. The feast is found in the West on different dates in the eighth century. The Roman Martyrology mentions that this date is a claim of fame for Gregory IV (827-844) and that he extended this observance to the whole of Christendom; it seems certain, however, that Gregory III (731-741) preceded him in this. At Rome, on the other hand, on May 13, there was the annual commemoration of the consecration of the basilica of St. Maria ad Martyres (or St. Mary and All Martyrs). This was the former Pantheon, the temple of Agrippa, dedicated to all the gods of paganism, to which Boniface IV had translated many relics from the catacombs. Gregory VII transferred the anniversary of this dedication to November 1.

    Things to Do:

    • Visiting a cemetery and praying for the dead during the Octave of All Saints’ Day (November 1 through November 8) will gain a plenary indulgence that can be applied only to the souls in purgatory. On other days, this work gains a partial indulgence.
    • Spend a little time after Mass thanking God for all the unnamed saints, some of whom could be our own relatives.
    • Have a special meal and if you have young children have them dress up like saints and play games.
    • Pray the Litany of the Saints — you could make it really special by chanting it (“he who sings prays twice”) and you could read an explanation of this litany, which is considered the model of all other litanies.
    • From the Catholic Culture library:

    Indulgences for All Souls Week
    An indulgence, applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory, is granted to the faithful, who devoutly visit a cemetery and pray, even if only mentally, for the departed. The indulgence is plenary each day from the first to the eighth of November; on other days of the year it is partial.


    A plenary indulgence, applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory, is granted to the faithful, who on the day dedicated to the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed [November 2 {as well as on the Sunday preceding or following, and on All Saints’ Day}] piously visit a church. In visiting the church it is required that one Our Father and the Creed be recited.


    To acquire a plenary indulgence it is necessary also to fulfill the following three conditions: sacramental Confession, Eucharistic communion, and prayer for the intention of the Holy Father. The three conditions may be fulfilled several days before or after the performance of the visit; it is, however, fitting that communion be received and the prayer for the intention of the Holy Father be said on the same day as the visit.


    The condition of praying for the intention of the Holy Father is fully satisfied by reciting one Our Father and one Hail Mary. A plenary indulgence can be acquired only once in the course of the day.


The Word Among Us

Meditation: Psalm 24:1-6

All Saints (Solemnity)

One . . . who desires not what is vain. (Psalm 24:4)

Two young girls were talking on the day of their First Communion. “What do you want to be when you grow up?” one asked. The other replied, “A saint. My grandmother told me I could be one.” That might sound cliché, but the grandmother was right. Sainthood isn’t just for extraordinary people. It’s within reach for all of us.

We see a good definition of a saint in today’s responsorial psalm. It describes a person who longs to see God’s face (Psalm 24:6) and who has not devoted his soul to what is vain (24:4). This person puts his hope and his heart into knowing and serving God. Notice sanctity is not a competition to donate the most money to the Church, to write the most beautiful prayers, or to help the most people. It’s about seeking to please the Lord. Pursuing sainthood is just that: a pursuit. Giving your best effort for God means just as much as whatever you “achieve.”

The feast of All Saints is about all the holy people who have gone before us—the hidden saints who are part of that great “cloud of witnesses” in heaven (Hebrews 12:1). It’s also a good time to honor the people you have known who made serving the Lord their greatest desire. Maybe it’s a religious education teacher who stayed up late working on lesson plans. It could be a parent who tried to get his child excited about special feast days like this one. Or perhaps it’s a priest or religious sister who supported a new ministry at your parish. In each case, it is the person’s desire and effort that sets them apart and places them on the road to sainthood.

Never forget that great cloud of witnesses surrounding you. And never forget that you are part of it! There is no “us” and “them” when it comes to sanctity. By the grace of God, there is only “us.”

“Jesus, set me on the path to sainthood by showing me how to serve you. Lord, I want to help build your kingdom!”

Revelation 7:2-4, 9-14
1 John 3:1-3
Matthew 5:1-12


Marriage = One Man and One Woman Until Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for November 1, 2017:

Married couples sometimes speak of leading each other to heaven. Show your spouse how much God loves them by doing an unexpected kindness for them today.


Regnum Christi

November 1, 2017 – Winning the Only Contest that Matters

Solemnity of All Saints
Father James Swanson, LC

Matthew 5:1-12a

When Jesus saw the crowds, he went up the mountain, and after he had sat down, his disciples came to him. He began to teach them, saying: “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are they who mourn, for they will be comforted. Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the land. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be satisfied. Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy. Blessed are the clean of heart, for they will see God. Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God. Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are you when they insult you and persecute you and utter every kind of evil against you falsely because of me. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe in you with a faith that never seeks to test you. I trust in you, hoping to learn to accept and follow your will, even when it does not make sense to the way that I see things. I love you, and I want to love you and those around me with a love similar to the love you have shown to me.

Petition: Lord, help me accept sacrifices and overcome difficulties in order to gain heaven.

1. The Beatitudes Don’t Make Sense: As we celebrate the Solemnity of All Saints’ Day, the Church calls us to contemplate the promises Jesus makes to all those who follow him. At first, they don’t seem very attractive. Jesus lists a whole series of things that most people would probably avoid. They would see them as interfering with their wants and desires, Yet, Jesus says that we will be blessed if we have them in our lives. The word in the original Greek is makarios, which means “happy”. This doesn’t make sense. I am supposed to be happy when I am poor, mourning, meek, lacking righteousness, merciful, clean-hearted, a peacemaker, persecuted and insulted? That’s not what I see on TV, in the movies, on the Internet. It’s not what many of the people I know would recommend. So what is Jesus’ big idea telling me this? Is he out to make me miserable?

2. Sacrificing for Worldly Glory: We can see that the whole picture isn’t gloomy. Jesus says that if we accept these difficult things, there will be rewards. And the rewards sound pretty good. In fact, they sound great: the Kingdom of Heaven, comfort, inheriting the land, satisfaction in seeing righteousness done, receiving mercy, seeing God, being a child of God, a great reward in heaven. Who wouldn’t want these things? Don’t people work a lot harder for a lot less? Don’t athletes train for years, giving up all kinds of pleasures, submitting themselves to intense suffering at times only for a brief moment of glory in some competition? Don’t businessmen work long hours, giving up pleasures and making immense sacrifices just to make a few more dollars? Isn’t what Jesus offers us much better than any of that? Better than a gold medal or even a million dollars?

3. But I Am Not Interested in Heavenly Things: Anything worth having is worth making sacrifices for, and the more it is worth, the greater sacrifices we should be willing to make for it. Perhaps a gold medal is worth the sacrifices the athlete makes to win it. Perhaps a million dollars are worth the sacrifices that a businessman makes to gain them. If heaven is really all it is supposed to be, isn’t it worth all the sacrifices Jesus mentions here – and more? If people are willing to make such great sacrifices to gain things they cannot keep, shouldn’t I be willing to make even greater sacrifices to gain the eternal happiness of heaven? Of course, many people with the talent to do great things in this world never do them because they just aren’t that interested or motivated. Is that why I don’t do more to gain heaven? Just not that interested? What will it take to motivate me to really desire what Jesus offers?

Conversation with Christ: Dear Jesus, I don’t do much to make the Beatitudes come to life in me. Help me to give heaven its full value. Help me to desire it more each day. Help me to meditate on what heaven will be like so I will love it more and more and be willing to do anything – whatever it takes – to get there and help many others arrive as well.

Resolution: I will spend at least five minutes today imagining what heaven will be like so as to increase my desire for heaven and enable me to make the sacrifices necessary to get there. Jesus is setting up a mansion there for me. He is going to put everything that he can in it to please me and make me happy.


One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Espa�ol

All Issues > Volume 33, Issue 6

Promise: “Blest are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they shall have their fill.” Mt 5:6Praise: “Salvation is from our God, Who is seated on the throne, and from the Lamb!” (Rv 7:10

Prayer: Father, make my desire to be holy stronger than my desire to breathe, eat, drink, have sex, or make money.

<< Wednesday, November 1, 2017 >>All Saints
 Revelation 7:2-4, 9-14
1 John 3:1-3

View Readings
Psalm 24:1-6
Matthew 5:1-12

Similar Reflections
 

LOVED TO BE HOLY

 “See what love the Father has bestowed on us in letting us be called children of God!” �1 John 3:1

To become a saint in heaven, we must be baptized (see Mk 16:16), totally commit our lives to Jesus, and have a strong desire to be holy in every aspect of our conduct (1 Pt 1:15). We must strive “for that holiness without which no one can see the Lord” (Heb 12:14). To do this, we must hunger and thirst for righteousness and holiness (Mt 5:6).

We naturally do not have a strong desire to grow in holiness. Therefore, the Lord tries to increase our desire for holiness by commanding us to be holy (1 Pt 1:16) and by warning us that those who are not holy will eventually be hurled “into the fiery furnace where they will wail and grind their teeth” (Mt 13:42). Nevertheless, God’s command and warning usually does not make that much of an impression on us. All of us have strong desires to avoid pain, be accepted, and have comfortable, easy lives. However, holiness entails surviving “the great period of trial” (Rv 7:14) and being persecuted, insulted, and slandered because of Jesus (Mt 5:10-11). It’s very hard for us to desire to be holy under these conditions. To strongly desire holiness, we need something stronger than commandments, warnings, selfishness, and fears.

“Christ loved the Church. He gave Himself up for her to make her holy” (Eph 5:25-26). Christ loves us into desiring holiness and being holy. Let His love conquer all.


Restoring The Sacred . . . Reverencing The Saints
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For All the Saints – Reflecting on a Great Hymn of the Church
Halloween and All Saints Day

Solemnity of All Saints [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Benedict on All Saints’ Day: “In the saints we see the victory of love over selfishness and death”
Saints are sealed by God, called to be sons of God, and saved by God [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

All Saints or All Souls? Differences should be black and white
The love of the saints [All Saints Day] (Catholic Caucus)
All Saints’ Day [Catholic Caucus]
All Saints’ Day, (All Hallows’ Day, or “Hallowmas”) [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

Bishops’ Halloween Advice: Dress Children Up as Saints, Not Witches
‘We are never alone,’ Pope exclaims on All Saints Day
No Mistaking a Saint [Catholic Caucus]

Celebrating ‘All Hallows Eve’ and the ‘Feast of All Saints’ in a Pre-Christian West
“From the Pastor” ALL SAINTS & ALL SOULS
All Saints 2009

An Apologetics Primer on Explaining the Communion of Saints …
THE SAINTS From Around the Year with the TRAPP FAMILY
The Veneration and Imitation of the Saints

Hallowe’en — Eve of All Saints, October 31st
For All the Saints (College Campuses Seeing Catholic Processions)
Know Your Saints Quiz for families — Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
All Saints and All Souls

Anonymous Saints [Solemnity of All Saints]
All Saints, All Souls and the Four Last Things
All Saints Day in Poland (beautiful photos)

The Feast of All Saints – What are the origins of All Saints Day and All Souls Day?
All Saints Day – November 2005
All Saints and All Souls
All Saints Day – November 1
The Communion of All Saints
VESPERS (Evening Prayer)Nov.1 2003 Feast of ALL SAINTS
Ideas for Sanctifying Halloween, All Saints Day and All Souls Day

All-Saints.jpg

 

Details

Date:
November 1
Event Categories:
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Venue

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
10 St. Francis Way
Passaic, NJ 07055 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
973-473-0246
Website:
www.olmcpassaic.com