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Saint Scholastica (sister of St. Benedict)

February 10

|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every year that begins at 12:00am on of February, repeating indefinitely

Scholastica (c. 480 – 10 February 543) is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. Born in Italy, according to a ninth century tradition, she was the twin sister of Benedict of Nursia. Her feast day is 10 February.

Saint Scholastica – Wikipedia


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scholastica

The Feeding of the Multitude

Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry
ca. 800
1411-1416

To: All
Saint Scholastica Franciscan Media

<em>Death of Saint Scholastica</em> | detail | Johann Baptist Wenzel BerglImage: Death of Saint Scholastica | detail | Johann Baptist Wenzel Bergl

Saint Scholastica

Franciscan Media

Image: Death of Saint Scholastica | detail | Johann Baptist Wenzel Bergl

Saint Scholastica

Saint of the Day for February 10

(c. 480 – February 10, 542)

Saint Scholastica’s Story

Twins often share the same interests and ideas with an equal intensity. Therefore, it is no surprise that Scholastica and her twin brother, Benedict, established religious communities within a few miles from each other.

Born in 480 of wealthy parents, Scholastica and Benedict were brought up together until he left central Italy for Rome to continue his studies.

Little is known of Scholastica’s early life. She founded a religious community for women near Monte Cassino at Plombariola, five miles from where her brother governed a monastery.

The twins visited each other once a year in a farmhouse because Benedict was not permitted inside the monastery. They spent these times discussing spiritual matters.

According to the Dialogues of St. Gregory the Great, the brother and sister spent their last day together in prayer and conversation. Scholastica sensed her death was close at hand and she begged Benedict to stay with her until the next day.

He refused her request because he did not want to spend a night outside the monastery, thus breaking his own Rule. Scholastica asked God to let her brother remain and a severe thunderstorm broke out, preventing Benedict and his monks from returning to the abbey.

Benedict cried out, “God forgive you, Sister. What have you done?” Scholastica replied, “I asked a favor of you and you refused. I asked it of God and he granted it.”

Brother and sister parted the next morning after their long discussion. Three days later, Benedict was praying in his monastery and saw the soul of his sister rising heavenward in the form of a white dove. Benedict then announced the death of his sister to the monks and later buried her in the tomb he had prepared for himself.

Reflection

Scholastica and Benedict gave themselves totally to God and gave top priority to deepening their friendship with him through prayer. They sacrificed some of the opportunities they would have had to be together as brother and sister in order better to fulfill their vocation to the religious life. In coming closer to Christ, however, they found they were also closer to each other. In joining a religious community, they did not forget or forsake their family but rather found more brothers and sisters.

Saint Scholastica is the Patron Saint of:

Nuns


Saintly Siblings [Catholic Caucus]
The Divine Office: Saint Scholastica
OF A MIRACLE WROUGHT BY HIS SISTER SCHOLASTICA
St. Benedict and St. Scholastica (Twins)
A Patron Saint for Nuns [St. Scholastica]
St. Scholastica, Virgin and Religious Founder


Information: St. Scholastica

Feast Day: February 10

Born: 480, Nursia, Italy

Died: 543

Patron of: convulsive children; nuns; invoked against storms and rain


CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Saturday, February 10

Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Memorial of St. Scholastica, virgin.
She was the twin sister of St. Benedict and both
dedicated their lives to God. At her death in
543 A.D., Benedict had a vision of her soul in
the form of a dove leaving her body and
entering heaven.


Catholic Culture

Ordinary Time: February 10th

Memorial of St. Scholastica, virgin

MASS READINGS

February 10, 2018 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

As we celebrate anew the Memorial of the Virgin Saint Scholastica, we pray, O Lord, that, following her example, we may serve you with pure love and happily receive what comes from loving you. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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Old Calendar: St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica was the twin sister of St. Benedict, the Patriarch of Western monasticism. She was born in Umbria, Italy, about 480. Under Benedict’s direction, Scholastica founded a community of nuns near the great Benedictine monastery Monte Cassino. Inspired by Benedict’s teaching, his sister devoted her whole life to seeking and serving God. She died in 547 and tradition holds that at her death her soul ascended to heaven in the form of a dove.

St. Scholastica
St. Scholastica, like her brother, dedicated herself to God from early youth. Information on the virgin Scholastica is very scanty. In his Second Book of Dialogues (Ch. 33 and 34) Pope St. Gregory has described for us the last meeting between brother and sister:

“His sister Scholastica, who had been consecrated to God in early childhood, used to visit with him once a year. On these occasions he would go to meet her in a house belonging to the monastery a short distance from the entrance. For this particular visit he joined her there with a few of his disciples and they spent the whole day singing God’s praises and conversing about the spiritual life.

“When darkness was setting in they took their meal together and continued their conversation at table until it was quite late. Then the holy nun said to him, ‘Please do not leave me tonight, brother. Let us keep on talking about the joys of heaven till morning.’ ‘What are you saying, sister?’ he replied. ‘You know that I cannot stay away from the monastery.’ The sky was so clear at the time, there was not a cloud in sight.

“At her brother’s refusal Scholastica folded her hands on the table and rested her head upon them in earnest prayer. When she looked up again, there was a sudden burst of lightning and thunder accompanied by such a downpour that Benedict and his companions were unable to set foot outside the door. By shedding a flood of tears while she prayed, this holy nun had darkened the cloudless sky with a heavy rain. The storm began as soon as her prayer was over. In fact, the two coincided so closely that the thunder was already resounding as she raised her head from the table. The very instant she ended her prayer the rain poured down.

“Realizing that he could not return to the abbey in this terrible storm, Benedict complained bitterly. ‘God forgive you, sister!’ he said. ‘What have you done?’ Scholastica simply answered, ‘When I appealed to you, you would not listen to me. So I turned to my God and He heard my prayer. Leave now if you can. Leave me here and go back to your monastery.’

“This, of course, he could not do. He had no choice now but to stay, in spite of his unwillingness. They spent the entire night together and both of them derived great profit from the holy thoughts they exchanged about the interior life. The next morning Scholastica returned to her convent and Benedict to his monastery.

“Three days later as he stood in his room looking up toward the sky, he beheld his sister’s soul leaving her body and entering the heavenly court in the form of a dove. Overjoyed at her eternal glory, he gave thanks to God in hymns of praise. Then, after informing his brethren of her death, he sent some of them to bring her body to the abbey and bury it in the tomb he had prepared for himself. The bodies of these two were now to share a common resting place, just as in life their souls had always been one in God.”

Her tomb is at Monte Cassino.

— Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Patron: Against rain; convulsive children; nuns; storms.

Symbols: Nun with crozier and crucifix; nun with dove flying from her mouth.

Things to Do:

  • Tell your children about the “holy twins”: St. Scholastica and the tender love she had for her brother St. Benedict. Ask them how they can help one another to become saints.

  • Make an altar hanging or window transparency in the shape of a dove to honor St. Scholastica.

  • If you are traveling to Italy try to visit St. Benedict’s Abbey of Monte Cassino. Here is a YouTube video with more pictures. If not, make a virtual visit.

  • Learn how to prayerfully read Sacred Scripture in this article, Lectio Divina: Daily Information for a New Life by Fr. Adam Ryan, O.S.B.


The Word Among Us

Meditation: 1 Kings 12:26-32; 13:33-34

Saint Scholastica, Virgin (Memorial)

The kingdom will return to David’s house. . . . and they will kill me. (1 Kings 12:26, 27)

We know that God can do amazing things. Yet often, when God promises something, and we see it gradually coming about, we begin to doubt or grow anxious. Like Peter walking on water, we forget to keep our eyes on Jesus. We focus on the immediacy of the wind and the waves instead of waiting in trust.

Jeroboam finds himself in a situation like this in today’s first reading. At the end of the previous chapter, God had promised to make him like David and establish a dynasty for him over the nation of Israel. What a shock for this official of King Solomon: God had chosen him to succeed his master! After he flees to Egypt and Solomon dies, Jeroboam does, in fact, find himself back in Israel and enthroned as king, just as God had promised.

But here is where the trouble begins. The Temple is in Jerusalem, and Jerusalem is controlled by Solomon’s son Rehoboam. Jeroboam begins to fear that the people’s connection to the Temple will cause them to abandon him. He decides to take matters into his own hands instead of trusting that God will fulfill his promise to give him the kingdom. And the results are disastrous.

Consider the promises that you have received from the Lord—certainly the promise of forgiveness and the promise of heaven. You may also be trusting him for help with your marriage or family relationships or a job situation. In all of these situations, God has a long-term plan for your good, but it requires you to wait on him. Waiting can be scary, and you might start to doubt. You might be tempted to try to get things to happen your way. But take your time. Act when you need to, but in the meantime, keep asking the Lord for his wisdom and guidance.

Jeroboam didn’t ask God to help him overcome his fear. Don’t make the same mistake! God stands ready to reassure you of his faithfulness so that you can continue trusting him to bring his promises to their glorious fulfillment. Go to him, and let him renew you in your journey of trust and hope.

“Lord, give me the faith and courage to wait on you for all the wonderful things you have promised.”

Psalm 106:6-7, 19-22
Mark 8:1-10


Marriage = One Man and One Woman Until Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for February 10, 2018:

Midpoint of National Marriage Week: tell your spouse three things you appreciate about him or her.


Regnum Christi

February 10, 2018 – Goodness in Abundance

09 Feb 2018

Memorial of Saint Scholastic, Virgin

Mark 8:1-10

In those days when there again was a great crowd without anything to eat, he summoned the disciples and said, “My heart is moved with pity for the crowd, because they have been with me now for three days and have nothing to eat. If I send them away hungry to their homes, they will collapse on the way, and some of them have come a great distance.” His disciples answered him, “Where can anyone get enough bread to satisfy them here in this deserted place?” Still he asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” “Seven,” they replied. He ordered the crowd to sit down on the ground. Then, taking the seven loaves he gave thanks, broke them, and gave them to his disciples to distribute, and they distributed them to the crowd. They also had a few fish. He said the blessing over them and ordered them distributed also. They ate and were satisfied. They picked up the fragments left over — seven baskets. There were about four thousand people. He dismissed them and got into the boat with his disciples and came to the region of Dalmanutha.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, how quickly I lose faith and begin to trust more in things that I can touch and see than in your promises and strength. But I do believe in you, that you are the Bread of Life, and that only you can satisfy the deepest longings of my heart. As you are my Creator, you know what I need and provide for me each day. As you are my Redeemer, you lead me along the pathway of the cross and forgiveness. I want to follow you more closely.

Petition: Lord, strengthen my faith, so that I can be magnanimous like you.

  1. “I feel sorry for all these people.” Jesus shows compassion for the crowd, even for their temporal needs. He knows how earthly they can be, seeking only to satisfy their need for bread and water. In another passage he says, “Why worry about what you are to eat, or drink, or what you are to wear? … All these things the pagans seek” (Matthew 6:25-33) –– “pagans,” that is, those with no faith or trust in the heavenly Father. Our Lord does not worry about food and clothing for himself, although he does seek to provide them for others. But his charity doesn’t end there. He sincerely desires their greatest good, and for this reason gives them much more than a passing meal. Together with bread and water, he gives them the gift of faith. After all, man does not live on bread alone” (Luke 4:4).

  2. “Where could anyone get bread to feed these people in a deserted place like this? The apostles ask a very human question, revealing the poverty of their faith in Jesus. Such a question, without faith, would become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Since the task seems impossible, why try at all? How often does this way of thinking rein us in from doing great things for God and expecting great things from him? How often do we resign ourselves to defeat, content to mourn and lament seemingly hopeless situations, as if God were not almighty and willing to help us? We need the faith of the Blessed Virgin, who believed the impossible and became the mother of all who believe.

  3. “They ate as much as they wanted and they collected seven basketfuls of the scraps left over.” Jesus offers the fullness of life and love, an abundance of goodness and grace, to all who follow him. His ways are the ways of life. He allows us to suffer want in this life so that we will tap into the true source of abundance through faith, hope and love. Those who seek themselves by seeking purely material goods — which are limited by definition — will always be in want and will always feel the threat of losing what they have. Those who seek Christ and his grace — which is unlimited by definition — will never fear when they lose their earthly goods. That is why Jesus says that to anyone who has (faith, hope, love, grace, the gifts of the spiritual life), more will be given, and from the one who has not (none of these spiritual gifts), even what he seems to have (material possessions which are here today and gone tomorrow, always decaying and coming to an end) will be taken away (Luke 8:18).

Conversation with Christ: Lord, give me the gift of compassion, so that I may serve others with your heart. Give me the gifts of faith, hope and love so that I will understand that your goodness knows no bounds or limits, and that you wish to pour out your grace on all until our cups are overflowing.

Resolution: I will be magnanimous in my charity towards others today.


One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

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All Issues > Volume 34, Issue 2

<< Saturday, February 10, 2018 >>

St. Scholastica

1 Kings 12:26-32; 13:33-34

View Readings

Psalm 106:6-7, 19-22

Mark 8:1-10

Similar Reflections

THE SIN OF MAKING UP A RELIGION

“This was a sin on the part of the house of Jeroboam for which it was to be cut off and destroyed from the earth.” —1 Kings 13:34

One of the worst sins that can be committed is to make up our own religion. Jeroboam committed this sin, and we too are tempted to do this in many ways. How many people decide to reject certain teachings of the Lord and His Church? Isn’t that making up one’s own religion in part? How many Catholics ignore the Pope? Are they making a church without a pope, or are they making themselves to be popes? Isn’t this making up another religion?

Many Christians keep their religion to themselves. They have made their religion a private matter. However, Jesus did not make His religion a private matter. He commanded us to be His witnesses (Acts 1:8), proclaim His good news from the housetops (Mt 10:27), and not to be ashamed of the gospel (Rm 1:16). Isn’t a private religion a made-up religion?

Let’s not make up religions; rather, let’s make up with God. Let’s repent of trying to make God and religion in our own image and likeness. Let us submit to God’s religion, His kingdom, and His will.

Prayer: Father, teach me sweet submission.

Promise: “The people in the crowd ate until they had their fill; then they gathered up seven wicker baskets of leftovers. Those who had eaten numbered about four thousand.” —Mk 8:8-9

Praise: St. Scholastica desired unity with her twin brother, St. Benedict, so deeply that she “prayed up a thunderstorm” so that he would have to spend more time visiting with her.


Jesus loves all the children!

Details

Date:
February 10
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Organizer

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church
Phone:
(973) 473-0246

Venue

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
10 St. Francis Way
Passaic, NJ 07055 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
973-473-0246
Website:
www.olmcpassaic.com