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Saint Albert the Great, Bishop and Doctor of the Church

November 15 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

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For the readings of the Optional Memorial of Saint Albert the Great, please go here.

Saint Albert the Great | Vincenzo Onofri | photo by sailkoImage: Saint Albert the Great | Vincenzo Onofri | photo by sailko

Saint Albert the Great

Saint of the Day for November 15

(1206 – November 15, 1280)

 

 

Saint Albert the Great’s Story

Albert the Great was a 13th-century German Dominican who decisively influenced the Church’s stance toward Aristotelian philosophy brought to Europe by the spread of Islam.

Students of philosophy know him as the master of Thomas Aquinas. Albert’s attempt to understand Aristotle’s writings established the climate in which Thomas Aquinas developed his synthesis of Greek wisdom and Christian theology. But Albert deserves recognition on his own merits as a curious, honest, and diligent scholar.

He was the eldest son of a powerful and wealthy German lord of military rank. He was educated in the liberal arts. Despite fierce family opposition, he entered the Dominican novitiate.

His boundless interests prompted him to write a compendium of all knowledge: natural science, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, astronomy, ethics, economics, politics, and metaphysics. His explanation of learning took 20 years to complete. “Our intention,” he said, “is to make all the aforesaid parts of knowledge intelligible to the Latins.”

He achieved his goal while serving as an educator at Paris and Cologne, as Dominican provincial, and even as bishop of Regensburg for a short time. He defended the mendicant orders and preached the Crusade in Germany and Bohemia.

Albert, a Doctor of the Church, is the patron of scientists and philosophers.


Reflection

An information glut faces us Christians today in all branches of learning. One needs only to read current Catholic periodicals to experience the varied reactions to the findings of the social sciences, for example, in regard to Christian institutions, Christian life-styles, and Christian theology. Ultimately, in canonizing Albert, the Church seems to point to his openness to truth, wherever it may be found, as his claim to holiness. His characteristic curiosity prompted Albert to mine deeply for wisdom within a philosophy his Church warmed to with great difficulty.


Saint Albert the Great is the Patron Saint of:

Medical Technicians
Philosophers
Scientists


Another Saint of the Day for November 15 is Blessed Mary of the Passion.


November 15 – Memorial of Saint Albert the Great, bishop and doctor of the Church

Saint Albert the Great’s Story

Albert the Great was a 13th-century German Dominican who decisively influenced the Church’s stance toward Aristotelian philosophy brought to Europe by the spread of Islam.

Students of philosophy know him as the master of Thomas Aquinas. Albert’s attempt to understand Aristotle’s writings established the climate in which Thomas Aquinas developed his synthesis of Greek wisdom and Christian theology. But Albert deserves recognition on his own merits as a curious, honest, and diligent scholar.

He was the eldest son of a powerful and wealthy German lord of military rank. He was educated in the liberal arts. Despite fierce family opposition, he entered the Dominican novitiate.

His boundless interests prompted him to write a compendium of all knowledge: natural science, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, astronomy, ethics, economics, politics, and metaphysics. His explanation of learning took 20 years to complete. “Our intention,” he said, “is to make all the aforesaid parts of knowledge intelligible to the Latins.”

He achieved his goal while serving as an educator at Paris and Cologne, as Dominican provincial, and even as bishop of Regensburg for a short time. He defended the mendicant orders and preached the Crusade in Germany and Bohemia.

Albert, a Doctor of the Church, is the patron of scientists and philosophers.


Reflection

An information glut faces us Christians today in all branches of learning. One needs only to read current Catholic periodicals to experience the varied reactions to the findings of the social sciences, for example, in regard to Christian institutions, Christian life-styles, and Christian theology. Ultimately, in canonizing Albert, the Church seems to point to his openness to truth, wherever it may be found, as his claim to holiness. His characteristic curiosity prompted Albert to mine deeply for wisdom within a philosophy his Church warmed to with great difficulty.


Saint Albert the Great is the Patron Saint of:

Medical Technicians
Philosophers
Scientists


Another Saint of the Day for November 15 is Blessed Mary of the Passion.


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Blessed Mary of the Passion’s Story

Over the years, Mary grew to understand how she could best serve God.

Born Helene de Chappotin de Neuville, she came from a distinguished French family in Nantes. In 1860, she entered the Poor Clares, but poor health forced her to leave the following year. In 1864, she joined the Sisters of Mary Reparatrix and took the name Mary of the Passion. From 1865 to 1876, she worked in the Madura missions in India. In 1877, she established the Institute of the Missionaries of Mary, which became the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary (F.M.M.) in 1882 when she adopted the Third Order Rule.

Mary was still living when seven members of her community were martyred in the 1900 Boxer Uprising. In addition to caring for people afflicted with leprosy, her sisters have served in education, social service, nursing, and catechetics—frequently with Franciscan Missionaries of Mary of other nationalities.

She was beatified in 2002.


Reflection

Exactly what duties did God impose on Mary? Did he reveal to her precisely what work her sisters were to do? In prayer, Mary’s heart was purified, and she conformed even more to God’s ways. Prayer certainly led her to see ways of serving that she had not previously realized.

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13 posted on 11/15/2019, 8:25:05 AM by annalex (fear them not)
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Catholic Culture 

Ordinary Time: November 15th

Friday of the Thirty-Second Week of Ordinary Time; Optional Memorial of St. Albert the Great, bishop, confessor and doctor

MASS READINGS

November 15, 2019 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

O God, who made the Bishop Saint Albert great by his joining of human wisdom to divine faith, grant, we pray, that we may so adhere to the truths he taught, that through progress in learning we may come to a deeper knowledge and love of you. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Almighty and merciful God, graciously keep from us all adversity, so that, unhindered in mind and body alike, we may pursue in freedom of heart the things that are yours. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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Old Calendar: St. Albert the Great; St. Leopold of Austria (Hist)

Today the Church celebrates the optional memorial of St. Albert the Great, son of a German nobleman, who was studying at Padua when the Master General of the Dominicans, Jordan of Saxony, succeeded in attracting him to that Order. He was to become one of its greatest glories. After taking his degrees at the University of Paris he taught philosophy and theology at Paris and then in Cologne. St. Thomas Aquinas was among his pupils. His knowledge was encyclopedic. In 1260 he was named Bishop of Ratisbon and devoted himself zealously to the duties of his office. But soon resigned in order to continue his teaching and research. St. Albert died in Cologne on November 15, 1280.

St. Leopold of Austria is not on the Universal Roman Calendar but is included in the Roman Martyrology. He was born at Melk in Austria, a grandson of emperor Henry III. In 1096 he succeeded his father as fourth margrave of Austria. He married Agnes, daughter of Henry IV, by whom he had eighteen children. He ruled firmly and successfully for forty years, and was especially interested in the spread of religious institutions. He was the founder of Mariazell (Benedictine), Heiligenkreuz (Cistercian) and Klosternenburg (Augustinian). He was buried in the last mentioned monastery.

 


St. Albert the Great
Albert, the “light of Germany,” called the Great because of his encyclopedic knowledge, was born in 1193 at Lauingen, Donau. He studied at Padua, where under the influence of the second Dominican general, he joined the newly-founded Order of Preachers (1223). Soon he was sent to Germany, taught in various cities, particularly Cologne; Thomas Aquinas was his student. In 1248 he received the honor of Master in Sacred Theology at Paris. Throngs attended his lectures.

In 1254 Albert was chosen provincial of his Order in Germany. For a time he lived at the court of Pope Alexander II, who in 1260 made him bishop of Regensburg; two years later, however, he returned to his community at Cologne. There he acted as counselor, peacemaker, and shepherd of souls with great success. He died at the age of eighty-seven. Pope Pius XI numbered him among the ranks of the saints on December 16, 1931, and declared him a doctor of the Church. Much of his life was given to writing. His twenty-one folio volumes are devoted to commentaries on Aristotle (whose works were just then becoming known in the West) and the Bible. Legend credits him with drawing the ground plans for the cathedral at Cologne. Albert, the greatest German scholar of the Middle Ages, was outstanding in the fields of natural science, theology, and philosophy.

 

—Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Albert is named “Doctor Universalis” because of his vast knowledge and writings.

Patron: Archdiocese of Cincinnati, Ohio; medical technicians; natural sciences; philosophers; schoolchildren; scientists; students; students of theology.

Symbols: crosier of a bishop; cap of the teacher; large book; cross over the sun, the moon and the earth (symbolizing his theological wisdom and knowledge of nature); Man dressed as a Dominican bishop lecturing from a pulpit; man arguing with Saint Thomas Aquinas; Dominican holding a globe, lecturing from a pulpit, or studying.

Things to Do:

 

  • Learn more about St. Albert from the Catholic Encyclopedia, Dominicans
  • St. Albert is an especially apt patron for scientists because he made his love of truth about nature into an instrument of his love of Christ; 
  • Read what Pope Benedict XVI wrote about science and faith.

St. Leopold of Austria
Born at Melk, Austria, he was educated by Bishop Altman of Passau and succeeded his father as margrave of Austria when he was twenty-three. He married the daughter of Emperor Henry IV, by whom he had eighteen children, in 1106, founded the monasteries of Heiligenkreuz in the Wienerwald, Klosterneuburg, near Vienriazell in Styria, and was known for his piety and charity. He refused the imperial crown when his brother-in-law Henry V died in 1125. Leopold died after reigning as margrave for forty years at Klosterneuburg. He was surnamed “the Good” by his people and was canonized in 1486.

 

—Excerpted from the Dictionary of Saints, John J. Delaney

St. Leopold is the patron saint of Austria. This day is called Goose Day in Austria, another harvest festival that includes traditional menus of roast goose and the drinking of the new wine.

Patron: Austria (so named in 1663); death of children; large families; Lower Austria; step-parents; Upper Austria.

Symbols: Armed count with a cross on his coronet, a banner with three eagles, and a model of the church of Heiligenkreuz in his hand; before the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Anne; hunting with his courtiers, and finding his wife’s veil near the monastery of Klosterneuburg; with Saint Jerome; with his building Klosterneuburg; with the Blessed Virgin Mary appearing to him while hunting and the veil nearby.

Things to Do:

 

  • Prepare a dinner of Austrian Goulash or some other Austrian dish in honor of St. Leopold, or follow Austrian customs of roasting a goose and drinking new wine. See recipes for Martinmas (November 11) and Michaelmas (September 29). 
  • Learn more about Klosterneuburg Abbey that St. Leopold founded and the Canons Regular of Saint Augustine.

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The Word Among Us 

Meditation: Luke 17:26-37

Saint Albert the Great, Bishop and Doctor of the Church (Optional Memorial)

Whoever loses his life will save it. (Luke 17:33)

 

What’s the best thing you could do if you’re ever caught in quicksand? Relax! It may sound illogical, but the last thing you want to do is fight frantically to get out. Because the more you struggle, the deeper you will sink. The key is to loosen up, lean back, and allow your body to float. Your legs will slowly rise to the surface, and you’ll be able to gently pull yourself out and roll away. You just have to go against your instincts!

Fear and worry about the future can affect us in a way that’s similar to quicksand. Listening to reports of bad news, worrying about what might go wrong in our families, fear for our health—all those things can pull us down into a swamp of worry and apprehension. The more we focus on our anxious thoughts, the deeper we can sink.

Jesus’ approach to these chaotic thoughts might surprise you: don’t panic. Use the quicksand strategy instead. Instead of fretting about the future, focus on the present reality: he is already here. Try to stay calm and surrender to him so that you won’t sink.

Take today’s Gospel as a prime example. Jesus makes it clear that he doesn’t want his followers to get stuck in the fear of wondering when the Second Coming will happen or what it will look like. He doesn’t want them to fight in order to “save” their lives, especially in the face of fears about the future. He wants them to “lose” their lives by loosening their grip on anxiety.

How about you? Where do you see anxiety dragging you down? The next time you feel like you’re drowning in the quicksand of worry, try to relax and focus on Jesus and his plans for you today. His first coming launched a revolution of love and mercy. It built a solid foundation that can keep you from drowning. What’s even better, this solid foundation will grow ever stronger with every act of faith and trust you make.

So lean back into the Lord and let him draw you onto solid ground.

“Lord, help me to rest in your presence today. I want to let go of fear and doubt.”

 

Wisdom 13:1-9
Psalm 19:2-5

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Marriage = One Man and One Woman Until Death Do Us Part 

Daily Marriage Tip for November 15, 2019:

Do the chores you’ve been avoiding – the laundry that’s been piling up or the windows that need cleaning – together. Chores are always more fun when you’re not doing them alone.

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Regnum Christi 

November 15, 2019 – Living My Encounter with Christ

Friday of the Thirty-second Week in Ordinary Time

Father Edward Hopkins, LC

Luke 17:26-37

Jesus said to his disciples: “As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be in the days of the Son of Man; they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage up to the day that Noah entered the ark, and the flood came and destroyed them all. Similarly, as it was in the days of Lot: they were eating, drinking, buying, selling, planting, building; on the day when Lot left Sodom, fire and brimstone rained from the sky to destroy them all. So, it will be on the day the Son of Man is revealed. On that day, a person who is on the housetop and whose belongings are in the house must not go down to get them, and likewise a person in the field must not return to what was left behind. Remember the wife of Lot. Whoever seeks to preserve his life will lose it, but whoever loses it will save it. I tell you, on that night there will be two people in one bed; one will be taken, the other left. And there will be two women grinding meal together; one will be taken, the other left.” They said to him in reply, “Where, Lord?” He said to them, “Where the body is, there also the vultures will gather.”

Introductory Prayer: I believe in you, Lord, my companion and strength. I believe that you come out to meet me each day, asking me to depend more on you and less on creatures. I hope in you, Lord, as the one who fills my longing to love and be loved. I love you here and now with my prayer and with my desire to be faithful and generous in the little things you ask of me.

Petition: Lord, help me to put you first in my life.

  1. They Were Eating and Drinking: In the time of Noah and of Lot, God’s judgment was said to come down upon man. Yet the real moment of judgment for each one of us comes immediately upon our own death. It is then that the kingdom will be fully revealed to us, and it will be decided whether we will be part of it or not. But it is in the course of my own life that my option for being received into the kingdom is decided. God comes to me today. How will I respond? My response now and each day determines my eternal place in the kingdom.
  2. Do Not Return to What Was Left Behind: In most disasters people have little chance to collect belongings; those who try are often lost as a result. The same will be true of the Final Judgment – or at our own death; when Jesus comes, will I be ready? What do I most cherish? What I must hold on to is my relationship with Christ. And this implies in so many ways losing “my life” here. Do I live with the attitude of losing my life a little more each day, detaching myself from things, activities and people, so as to be freer to love, serve and be with Christ?
  3. Where the Body Is? “Where Lord?” the disciples ask; where will the day of the Son of man take place? It will take place, says Jesus, wherever you are. Whether we die and encounter Christ in a personal judgment or are alive to encounter the Lord at his Second Coming and the Final Judgment, the reality is the same. Standing next to a saint or a sinner will not alter our fate. Who we know or what contacts we have will do little. Where we are in our relationship with Christ will be the only real determining factor. Where am I, Lord, today, in relationship with you? May this be my only concern!

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, increase my desire to live my life in close relation with you. Order all my activities according to your will, and my relationships according to your heart. “I want whatever you want, because you want it, the way you want it, as long as you want it” (Prayer of Pope Clement XI).

Resolution: I will give priority to my relationship with Christ. I will make prayer my first act today before every meal.

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Homily of the Day

In the first reading we are encouraged to see the grandeur and power of God as Creator of the universe.

In the Gospel reading Jesus speaks of his coming at the end of time. Jesus urges us to be vigilant and ready, because his coming will occur when we least expect it. Waiting plays a big part in our lives, and so it is important to learn how to wait. As human beings we always wait because our lives are never complete in themselves.. There is always more to come.

Today’s Gospel instructs us how to recognize our Lord’s coming even in everyday things, in the duties we perform, in the events that occur around us, or in the people that we meet. It is not only at the time of death or at the end of the world that we will meet the Lord. We meet him when we least expect it, while we are waiting in a doctor’s office for an appointment, in a cashier’s line at the supermarket, or even at a bus stop.

Let us learn to see Christ in everyone, in everything and in every situation. Doing so, our waiting will not be one of endless frustration, but rather become one of constructive readiness and anticipation.

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One Bread, One Body 

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Espanol

All Issues > Volume 35, Issue 6

<< Friday, November 15, 2019 >> St. Albert the Great
 
Wisdom 13:1-9
View Readings
Psalm 19:2-5 Luke 17:26-37
Similar Reflections
 

THE WORST SURPRISE

 
“It was much the same in the days of Lot; they ate and drank, they bought and sold, they built and planted. But on the day Lot left Sodom, fire and brimstone rained down from heaven and destroyed them all. It will be like that on the day the Son of Man is revealed.” �Luke 17:28-30
 
Jesus’ second coming and the end of the world through fire is certain. However, the exact time of these events is uncertain. Jesus said that no one knows the day or the hour (Mk 13:32; Mt 25:13).

Nonetheless, Jesus has revealed to us in the Scriptures many of the happenings which will precede the day of the Lord. He has done this so that we can approximate His final coming and the end of the world. This helps us be better prepared and to help others be prepared.

However, Jesus has revealed in the Scriptures that many people will disregard or be ignorant of the Scriptural revelation about the end of the world. Thus, they will be clueless on the final day even though the magnitude and speed of the world’s destruction makes foreknowledge of the event even more critical. It will be “business as usual” up to the very end, as was the case before Noah’s flood and the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah (Lk 17:26ff). Those people well on their way to hell will be surprised at the world’s end. That’s why Jesus revealed so much about the end � to keep us from being surprised by the greatest catastrophe in history.

Don’t repeat the mistakes of the past. “Search the Scriptures” (Jn 5:39). Get ready for the great and terrible day. Come, Lord Jesus! (Rv 22:20)

 
Prayer: Father, I want to be ready and help as many as possible to also be ready.
Promise: “Whoever tries to preserve his life will lose it; whoever loses it will keep it.” —Lk 17:33
Praise: St. Albert had a profound impact on his student, St. Thomas Aquinas. Albert laid the groundwork for Thomas’ synthesis of Greek wisdom and Christian theology.

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Details

Date:
November 15
Time:
8:00 am - 5:00 pm