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St. Stephen of Hungary

August 16, 2022

August 16 – Memorial of Saint Stephen of Hungary

Saint Stephen of Hungary’s Story

The Church is universal, but its expression is always affected—for good or ill—by local culture. There are no “generic” Christians; there are Mexican Christians, Polish Christians, Filipino Christians. This fact is evident in the life of Stephen, national hero and spiritual patron of Hungary.

Born a pagan, he was baptized around the age of 10, together with his father, chief of the Magyars, a group who migrated to the Danube area in the ninth century. At 20, he married Gisela, sister to the future emperor, Saint Henry. When he succeeded his father, Stephen adopted a policy of Christianization of the country for both political and religious reasons. He suppressed a series of revolts by pagan nobles and welded the Magyars into a strong national group. He asked the pope to provide for the Church’s organization in Hungary—and also requested that the pope confer the title of king upon him. He was crowned on Christmas day in 1001.

Stephen established a system of tithes to support churches and pastors and to relieve the poor. Out of every 10 towns one had to build a church and support a priest. He abolished pagan customs with a certain amount of violence, and commanded all to marry, except clergy and religious. He was easily accessible to all, especially the poor.

In 1031, his son Emeric died, and the rest of Stephen’s days were embittered by controversy over his successor. His nephews attempted to kill him. He died in 1038 and was canonized, along with his son, in 1083.


Reflection

God’s gift of holiness is a Christlike love of God and humanity. Love must sometimes bear a stern countenance for the sake of ultimate good. Christ attacked hypocrites among the Pharisees, but died forgiving them. Paul excommunicated the incestuous man at Corinth “that his spirit may be saved.” Some Christians fought the Crusades with noble zeal, in spite of the unworthy motives of others.

Today, after senseless wars, and with a deeper understanding of the complex nature of human motives, we shrink from any use of violence—physical or “silent.” This wholesome development continues as people debate whether it is possible for a Christian to be an absolute pacifist or whether evil must sometimes be repelled by force.


Saint Stephen of Hungary is the Patron Saint of:

Bricklayers
Hungary


Another Saint of the Day for August 16 is Saint Roch.


King Stephen I

Hungary, Budapest, Heroes square

———————————————————————————————–

Catholic Culture

Ordinary Time: August 16th

Friday of the Nineteenth Week of Ordinary Time; Optional Memorial of St. Stephen of Hungary

MASS READINGS

August 16, 2019 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

Grant your Church, we pray, almighty God, that she may have Saint Stephen of Hungary, who fostered her growth while a king on earth, as her glorious defender in heaven. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Almighty ever-living God, whom, taught by the Holy Spirit, we dare to call our Father, bring, we pray, to perfection in our hearts the spirit of adoption as your sons and daughters, that we may merit to enter into the inheritance which you have promised. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

show

Recipes (8)

show

Activities (3)

show

Prayers (1)

show

Library (3)

» Enjoy our Liturgical Seasons series of e-books!

Old Calendar: St. Joachim, Father of the Blessed Virgin Mary, confessor; St. Roch

Vaik, son of Geza, Duke of Hungary, was baptized about 985 by St. Adalbert of Prague who gave him the name of Stephen. He was chosen by God to bring his people to the Christian faith. With the assistance of monks from Burgundy, he established bishoprics, founded several monasteries and re-organized the whole life of the country. Pope Silvester II offered him the privilege of being crowned king and the ceremony took place on December 25, 1000. His great zeal for the spread of the Catholic faith earned him the title of apostolic king and apostle of Hungary. He died on August 15, 1038, the feast of the Assumption of our Lady, to whom he had consecrated his kingdom.

Before the reform of the General Roman Calendar today was the feast of St. Joachim, now celebrated July 26. St. Stephen’s feast was September 2. St. Roch, who is in the Roman Martyrology, was from France, near Montpellier. By the sign of the cross he delivered many cities of Italy from an epidemic. His body was afterwards transferred to Venice, deposited with great honors in the church dedicated under his invocation.

 


St. Stephen
St. Stephen was the first Christian king of Hungary. He was born in 975 at Gran, the son of Prince Geisa, and was baptized in 985 by St. Adalbert. While courting Gisela, the sister of Emperor St. Henry II, he was promised her hand in marriage provided that he remain firm in the Christian faith and lead the pagan Hungarians to Christianity. He kept his word though it cost him dearly. From the hands of Pope Sylvester II (999-1003) he received the royal crown and was solemnly enthroned at Gran on the feast of Mary’s Assumption, 1001. (The alleged bull of Pope Sylvester granting to Stephen and his successors the privilege of having the cross carried before them, like metropolitans, is now regarded as a seventeenth-century forgery.)

Stephen was one of the wisest princes of his time. His royal generosity is shown in the establishment of the archbishopric of Gran and ten Hungarian bishoprics, and in his love toward the poor. Because he visited them in their houses and washed their feet, his right hand has remained incorrupt. Great was his zeal in prayer and meditation. From his marriage came a saintly son, the devout Emeric, an angel of purity, who died seven years before his father. By prayer and fasting Stephen sought the conversion of all Hungary; rightfully is he called the apostle of his nation. He chose the Mother of God as the patroness of Hungary.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Patron: Bricklayers; death of children; Hungary; kings; masons; stone masons; stonecutters.

Symbols: Cross and sword; model of a church.

Things to Do:

  • A saint upon the throne, who besides being king was the apostle and father of his people! Reflect his spirit in your own family and toward your associates.
  • Read more the history of Hungary. This site contains a wealth of information about the Hungarian Holy Crown, the Hand of St. Stephen and other information (Scroll down the page since the links don’t work). You can also visit this site for a virtual tour of Hungary.

 


St. Roch or Rocco
Untrustworthy sources say he was probably born at Montpellier, France, son of the governor there. He was orphaned when he was twenty. He went on pilgrimage to Rome and devoted himself to caring for the victims of a plague that was ravaging Italy. He became a victim himself at Piacenza but recovered and was reputed to have performed many miracles of healing. On his return to Montpellier, he was imprisoned for five years as a spy in pilgrim’s disguise when his uncle, who was governor, ordered him imprisoned. (His uncle failed to recognize him, and Roch failed to identify himself.) Roch died in prison and was only then identified as the former governor’s son by a birthmark in the form of a cross on his chest. Another biographer says that he was arrested as a spy at Angers, Lombardy, and died in prison there. When miracles were reported at his intercession after his death, a popular cult developed, and he is invoked against pestilence and plague. He is known as Rocco in Italy and Roque in Spain.

Excerpted from the Dictionary of Saints, John J. Delaney

Patron: bachelors; cholera; diseased cattle; dogs; epidemics; falsely accused people; invalids; knee problems; plague; relief from pestilence; skin diseases; skin rashes; surgeons; tile makers; Barano, Italy; Castropignano, Italy; Constantinople; Istanbul; Orsogna, Italy; Patricia, Italy.

Symbols: Pilgrim’s hat and staff; angel; dog with loaf in mouth; hat with crossed keys of with escallop; plague spot on his thigh.

Things to Do:

  • Read more about San Rocco Festival in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania and the Italian traditions surrounding this saint.
28 posted on 8/17/2019, 1:25:28 AM by Salvation (“With God all things are possible.” Matthew 19:26)

To: All

The Word Among Us

Meditation: Psalm 136:1-3, 16-18, 21-22, 24

Saint Stephen of Hungary (Optional Memorial)

His mercy endures forever. (Psalm 136:1)

 

Both today’s psalm and the first reading tell us about the faithfulness of God. They both recount all that God had done in delivering the Israelites from slavery: he led his people through the wilderness, battled their enemies, and gave them the land for their heritage. Why? Because “his mercy endures forever” (Psalm 136:1).

God wanted to remind the people of his goodness toward them so that they would remember and stay faithful as they entered the Promised Land. He knew they would be surrounded by pagans who followed many false gods, so he wanted to make sure they would choose to serve him—and only him (Joshua 24:14-15).

Recounting the Lord’s mercy in our own lives has the same effect in us. When we make the effort, we can remember so many of the merciful things, both large and small, that God has done for us. And by reflecting on our own “salvation history,” we’ll see a pattern emerge, just as it did for Joshua and the psalmist. We’ll see God’s great mercy surfacing again and again. It will remind us of how often he has intervened to help us in difficult circumstances, and this will lead us to renew our commitment to obeying him and serving him. It will also give us hope as we deal with whatever challenges and sufferings we might be facing today.

Try this little exercise: compose your own psalm of praise based on your own experience of God’s work in your life up to now. For example, you might write, “Give thanks to the Lord, who healed my son when he was so sick” or “Give thanks to the Lord, who gave me a new job when I was unemployed.” You might even want to include the more ordinary ways he has shown you mercy: “Give thanks to the Lord for the time he protected me when my car broke down” or “Give thanks to the Lord for showing me how to listen to my grieving friend.”

Pull out your psalm from time to time and add to it. The more you remember, the more your heart will overflow in love and gratitude for the God whose mercy knows no bounds!

“Lord, thank you for your enduring mercy in my life.”

 

Joshua 24:1-13
Matthew 19:3-12

——————————————————————————————————–

Marriage = One Man and One Woman Until Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for August 16, 2019:

To genuinely listen is no easy task. Nonetheless, listening is an essential part of communication. Need tips to listen better? Check out this For Your Marriage article: http://pre2018.foryourmarriage.org/just-because-youre-quiet-doesnt-mean-youre-listening/.

——————————————————————————————————–

 

Regnum Christi

August 16, 2019 – From the Beginning It Was Not So…

Friday of the Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time

Matthew 19: 3-12

Some Pharisees approached Jesus, and tested him, saying, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife for any cause whatever?” He said in reply, “Have you not read that from the beginning the Creator made them male and female and said, For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh? So, they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore, what God has joined together, no human being must separate.” They said to him, “Then why did Moses command that the man give the woman a bill of divorce and dismiss her?” He said to them, “Because of the hardness of your hearts Moses allowed you to divorce your wives, but from the beginning it was not so. I say to you, whoever divorces his wife (unless the marriage is unlawful) and marries another commits adultery.” His disciples said to him, “If that is the case of a man with his wife, it is better not to marry.” He answered, “Not all can accept this word, but only those to whom that is granted. Some are incapable of marriage because they were born so; some, because they were made so by others; some, because they have renounced marriage for the sake of the Kingdom of heaven. Whoever can accept this ought to accept it.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord God, I believe in your presence here with me as I begin this moment of prayer. I hope in you. I know that you will always take care of me. I want this time with you to be a sign of my love for you. I seek only to please you, without desiring any spiritual consolation for myself.

Petition: Lord God, fill me with your grace so I can meet your lofty expectations.

  1. Hardness of Their Hearts: The Pharisees heard Jesus’ teaching against divorce at the Sermon on the Mount, a teaching which contradicted the practice of the Jews. And so, they sought to trap him in this instance into putting his teaching in opposition to Moses. They were hoping to discredit him. But Jesus knew their twisted intentions and grounded his teaching on God’s original plan for man and woman. He knows that they were looking to get around the will of God and carve exceptions. Jesus felt no need to pander to the crowd or offer an easier way out when challenged. His focus was on what God intended. Even today he challenges everyone to respond.
  1. A New Law: Jesus’ teaching seems so counter-cultural, no less today than in his own time. How can he be so bold and ask for so much, since we still labor under the same sin, imperfection and hardness of heart as the people of Moses’ time and his time? The key is that Jesus does not simply add new laws; he brings the grace to be able to live as God intended “from the beginning,” that is, before sin entered the world. Christ can ask more of us because he himself brings the grace for us to live our lives before God in a new way. By grace we are made “new men (and women) in Christ” and transformed into children of God who are empowered to live in holiness and the full truth.
  1. Never Give Up: The disciples seem to be discouraged at first, because the new teaching of Jesus is difficult to live: “then it is better not to marry.” They are seeing things through their own narrow experience and through the lens of popular opinion. Yet they must make the transforming encounter with the grace of Christ. We, too, need to believe in that grace and to communicate it to others, since it enables us to love others “as he loved us.” It is what brings the vitality and freshness to our Christian lives and makes us able to offer something new and hopeful to the world around us.

Conversation with Christ: Jesus, give me the faith and confidence to believe with all my heart that your grace is enough for me. Teach me to believe that your commands are always supported by your grace and that I can live as a new man in you.

Resolution: I will ask for an unbreakable hope in the power of God’s grace acting in me.

—————————————————————————————————————–

 

Homily of the Day

Friday of the Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time

Jesus laid down his life so that we may live forever. If we could fix in our minds that all God’s actions manifest his love, then maybe we could come to a better understanding of his laws, even difficult ones like the one about divorce in the Gospel.

If we are convinced that everything that God does is out of love, then we can see that his laws are not meant to subdue us. His laws are not an affliction. Of course, life is never simple or easy.

But how we approach it is important. We cannot afford to tire of hearing about God’s love for us. If we are attentive, we will see that every scripture reading ultimately comes down to the same thing, namely that God loves us and asks us for our love in return.

——————————————————————————————————

 

One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Espa�ol

All Issues > Volume 35, Issue 5

<< Friday, August 16, 2019 >> St. Stephen of Hungary
 
Joshua 24:1-13
View Readings
Psalm 136:1-3, 16-18, 21-22, 24 Matthew 19:3-12
Similar Reflections

Catholic Culture

Ordinary Time: August 16th

Friday of the Nineteenth Week of Ordinary Time; Optional Memorial of St. Stephen of Hungary

MASS READINGS

August 16, 2019 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

Grant your Church, we pray, almighty God, that she may have Saint Stephen of Hungary, who fostered her growth while a king on earth, as her glorious defender in heaven. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Almighty ever-living God, whom, taught by the Holy Spirit, we dare to call our Father, bring, we pray, to perfection in our hearts the spirit of adoption as your sons and daughters, that we may merit to enter into the inheritance which you have promised. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

show

Recipes (8)

show

Activities (3)

show

Prayers (1)

show

Library (3)

» Enjoy our Liturgical Seasons series of e-books!

Old Calendar: St. Joachim, Father of the Blessed Virgin Mary, confessor; St. Roch

Vaik, son of Geza, Duke of Hungary, was baptized about 985 by St. Adalbert of Prague who gave him the name of Stephen. He was chosen by God to bring his people to the Christian faith. With the assistance of monks from Burgundy, he established bishoprics, founded several monasteries and re-organized the whole life of the country. Pope Silvester II offered him the privilege of being crowned king and the ceremony took place on December 25, 1000. His great zeal for the spread of the Catholic faith earned him the title of apostolic king and apostle of Hungary. He died on August 15, 1038, the feast of the Assumption of our Lady, to whom he had consecrated his kingdom.

Before the reform of the General Roman Calendar today was the feast of St. Joachim, now celebrated July 26. St. Stephen’s feast was September 2. St. Roch, who is in the Roman Martyrology, was from France, near Montpellier. By the sign of the cross he delivered many cities of Italy from an epidemic. His body was afterwards transferred to Venice, deposited with great honors in the church dedicated under his invocation.

 


St. Stephen
St. Stephen was the first Christian king of Hungary. He was born in 975 at Gran, the son of Prince Geisa, and was baptized in 985 by St. Adalbert. While courting Gisela, the sister of Emperor St. Henry II, he was promised her hand in marriage provided that he remain firm in the Christian faith and lead the pagan Hungarians to Christianity. He kept his word though it cost him dearly. From the hands of Pope Sylvester II (999-1003) he received the royal crown and was solemnly enthroned at Gran on the feast of Mary’s Assumption, 1001. (The alleged bull of Pope Sylvester granting to Stephen and his successors the privilege of having the cross carried before them, like metropolitans, is now regarded as a seventeenth-century forgery.)

Stephen was one of the wisest princes of his time. His royal generosity is shown in the establishment of the archbishopric of Gran and ten Hungarian bishoprics, and in his love toward the poor. Because he visited them in their houses and washed their feet, his right hand has remained incorrupt. Great was his zeal in prayer and meditation. From his marriage came a saintly son, the devout Emeric, an angel of purity, who died seven years before his father. By prayer and fasting Stephen sought the conversion of all Hungary; rightfully is he called the apostle of his nation. He chose the Mother of God as the patroness of Hungary.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Patron: Bricklayers; death of children; Hungary; kings; masons; stone masons; stonecutters.

Symbols: Cross and sword; model of a church.

Things to Do:

  • A saint upon the throne, who besides being king was the apostle and father of his people! Reflect his spirit in your own family and toward your associates.
  • Read more the history of Hungary. This site contains a wealth of information about the Hungarian Holy Crown, the Hand of St. Stephen and other information (Scroll down the page since the links don’t work). You can also visit this site for a virtual tour of Hungary.

 


St. Roch or Rocco
Untrustworthy sources say he was probably born at Montpellier, France, son of the governor there. He was orphaned when he was twenty. He went on pilgrimage to Rome and devoted himself to caring for the victims of a plague that was ravaging Italy. He became a victim himself at Piacenza but recovered and was reputed to have performed many miracles of healing. On his return to Montpellier, he was imprisoned for five years as a spy in pilgrim’s disguise when his uncle, who was governor, ordered him imprisoned. (His uncle failed to recognize him, and Roch failed to identify himself.) Roch died in prison and was only then identified as the former governor’s son by a birthmark in the form of a cross on his chest. Another biographer says that he was arrested as a spy at Angers, Lombardy, and died in prison there. When miracles were reported at his intercession after his death, a popular cult developed, and he is invoked against pestilence and plague. He is known as Rocco in Italy and Roque in Spain.

Excerpted from the Dictionary of Saints, John J. Delaney

Patron: bachelors; cholera; diseased cattle; dogs; epidemics; falsely accused people; invalids; knee problems; plague; relief from pestilence; skin diseases; skin rashes; surgeons; tile makers; Barano, Italy; Castropignano, Italy; Constantinople; Istanbul; Orsogna, Italy; Patricia, Italy.

Symbols: Pilgrim’s hat and staff; angel; dog with loaf in mouth; hat with crossed keys of with escallop; plague spot on his thigh.

Things to Do:

  • Read more about San Rocco Festival in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania and the Italian traditions surrounding this saint.

———————————————–

 

d Among Us

Meditation: Psalm 136:1-3, 16-18, 21-22, 24

Saint Stephen of Hungary (Optional Memorial)

His mercy endures forever. (Psalm 136:1)

 

Both today’s psalm and the first reading tell us about the faithfulness of God. They both recount all that God had done in delivering the Israelites from slavery: he led his people through the wilderness, battled their enemies, and gave them the land for their heritage. Why? Because “his mercy endures forever” (Psalm 136:1).

God wanted to remind the people of his goodness toward them so that they would remember and stay faithful as they entered the Promised Land. He knew they would be surrounded by pagans who followed many false gods, so he wanted to make sure they would choose to serve him—and only him (Joshua 24:14-15).

Recounting the Lord’s mercy in our own lives has the same effect in us. When we make the effort, we can remember so many of the merciful things, both large and small, that God has done for us. And by reflecting on our own “salvation history,” we’ll see a pattern emerge, just as it did for Joshua and the psalmist. We’ll see God’s great mercy surfacing again and again. It will remind us of how often he has intervened to help us in difficult circumstances, and this will lead us to renew our commitment to obeying him and serving him. It will also give us hope as we deal with whatever challenges and sufferings we might be facing today.

Try this little exercise: compose your own psalm of praise based on your own experience of God’s work in your life up to now. For example, you might write, “Give thanks to the Lord, who healed my son when he was so sick” or “Give thanks to the Lord, who gave me a new job when I was unemployed.” You might even want to include the more ordinary ways he has shown you mercy: “Give thanks to the Lord for the time he protected me when my car broke down” or “Give thanks to the Lord for showing me how to listen to my grieving friend.”

Pull out your psalm from time to time and add to it. The more you remember, the more your heart will overflow in love and gratitude for the God whose mercy knows no bounds!

“Lord, thank you for your enduring mercy in my life.”

 

Joshua 24:1-13
Matthew 19:3-12

29 posted on 8/17/2019, 1:32:33 AM by Salvation (“With God all things are possible.” Matthew 19:26)

To: All

Marriage = One Man and One Woman Until Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for August 16, 2019:

To genuinely listen is no easy task. Nonetheless, listening is an essential part of communication. Need tips to listen better? Check out this For Your Marriage article: http://pre2018.foryourmarriage.org/just-because-youre-quiet-doesnt-mean-youre-listening/.

————————————————————————————-

Regnum Christi

August 16, 2019 – From the Beginning It Was Not So…

Friday of the Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time

Matthew 19: 3-12

Some Pharisees approached Jesus, and tested him, saying, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife for any cause whatever?” He said in reply, “Have you not read that from the beginning the Creator made them male and female and said, For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh? So, they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore, what God has joined together, no human being must separate.” They said to him, “Then why did Moses command that the man give the woman a bill of divorce and dismiss her?” He said to them, “Because of the hardness of your hearts Moses allowed you to divorce your wives, but from the beginning it was not so. I say to you, whoever divorces his wife (unless the marriage is unlawful) and marries another commits adultery.” His disciples said to him, “If that is the case of a man with his wife, it is better not to marry.” He answered, “Not all can accept this word, but only those to whom that is granted. Some are incapable of marriage because they were born so; some, because they were made so by others; some, because they have renounced marriage for the sake of the Kingdom of heaven. Whoever can accept this ought to accept it.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord God, I believe in your presence here with me as I begin this moment of prayer. I hope in you. I know that you will always take care of me. I want this time with you to be a sign of my love for you. I seek only to please you, without desiring any spiritual consolation for myself.

Petition: Lord God, fill me with your grace so I can meet your lofty expectations.

  1. Hardness of Their Hearts: The Pharisees heard Jesus’ teaching against divorce at the Sermon on the Mount, a teaching which contradicted the practice of the Jews. And so, they sought to trap him in this instance into putting his teaching in opposition to Moses. They were hoping to discredit him. But Jesus knew their twisted intentions and grounded his teaching on God’s original plan for man and woman. He knows that they were looking to get around the will of God and carve exceptions. Jesus felt no need to pander to the crowd or offer an easier way out when challenged. His focus was on what God intended. Even today he challenges everyone to respond.
  1. A New Law: Jesus’ teaching seems so counter-cultural, no less today than in his own time. How can he be so bold and ask for so much, since we still labor under the same sin, imperfection and hardness of heart as the people of Moses’ time and his time? The key is that Jesus does not simply add new laws; he brings the grace to be able to live as God intended “from the beginning,” that is, before sin entered the world. Christ can ask more of us because he himself brings the grace for us to live our lives before God in a new way. By grace we are made “new men (and women) in Christ” and transformed into children of God who are empowered to live in holiness and the full truth.
  1. Never Give Up: The disciples seem to be discouraged at first, because the new teaching of Jesus is difficult to live: “then it is better not to marry.” They are seeing things through their own narrow experience and through the lens of popular opinion. Yet they must make the transforming encounter with the grace of Christ. We, too, need to believe in that grace and to communicate it to others, since it enables us to love others “as he loved us.” It is what brings the vitality and freshness to our Christian lives and makes us able to offer something new and hopeful to the world around us.

Conversation with Christ: Jesus, give me the faith and confidence to believe with all my heart that your grace is enough for me. Teach me to believe that your commands are always supported by your grace and that I can live as a new man in you.

Resolution: I will ask for an unbreakable hope in the power of God’s grace acting in me.

——————————————————————–

 

Homily of the Day

Friday of the Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time

Jesus laid down his life so that we may live forever. If we could fix in our minds that all God’s actions manifest his love, then maybe we could come to a better understanding of his laws, even difficult ones like the one about divorce in the Gospel.

If we are convinced that everything that God does is out of love, then we can see that his laws are not meant to subdue us. His laws are not an affliction. Of course, life is never simple or easy.

But how we approach it is important. We cannot afford to tire of hearing about God’s love for us. If we are attentive, we will see that every scripture reading ultimately comes down to the same thing, namely that God loves us and asks us for our love in return.

———————————————————————————————————–

 

One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Espa�ol

All Issues > Volume 35, Issue 5

<< Friday, August 16, 2019 >> St. Stephen of Hungary
 
Joshua 24:1-13
View Readings
Psalm 136:1-3, 16-18, 21-22, 24 Matthew 19:3-12
Similar Reflections
 
 

 

 
Prayer: Father, I pray for many to accept the call to be celibate for Your kingdom.
Promise: “I gave you a land which you had not tilled and cities which you had not built, to dwell in; you have eaten of vineyards and olive groves which you did not plant.” —Jos 24:13
Praise: St. Stephen was King of Hungary and invited the Benedictines to evangelize the country. His son Emeric is also a canonized saint.

Details

Date:
August 16, 2022